Epimetheus (Titan) of afterthought

Epimetheus was one of the Titans, son of Iapetus and Clymene. He was the brother of Prometheus, Atlas and Menoetius. His name is derived from the Greek word meaning ‘afterthought’, which is the antonym of his brother’s name, Prometheus, meaning ‘forethought’. In this context, Epimetheus appeared as a foolish character, while Prometheus was the clever one.

Prometheus and Epimetheus were told to distribute characteristics to the newly created animals. Epimetheus started giving a positive trait to every animal, but lacking foresight, he realised that he had distributed all traits without having any left to give to man. So, Prometheus gave mankind the civilizing arts and fire.

Epimetheus received Pandora as a gift from the gods; a human created by the gods specifically to punish the humans. The marriage of Epimetheus and Pandora is not explicit in any source, but only implied; from their union, Pyrrha, their daughter, was born. Pandora was given a jar which contained all evils of humanity; curious to see what was inside, she opened it and all evils were released into the world. Shocked, she closed it as soon as she could, but only Hope remained trapped inside.

Epimetheus Is also called Epimitheas.

See Also: Titans, Iapetus, Prometheus, Atlas, Menoetius, Zeus

http://www.greekmythology.com/Titans/Epimetheus/epimetheus.html


Ἐπιμηθεύς (Epimētheús)1)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures (Other Titans) Titan of afterthought and the father of excuses.


gift_to_EpimetheusIn Greek mythology, Epimetheus (/ɛpˈmθəs/; Greek: Ἐπιμηθεύς, which might mean “hindsight”, literally “afterthinker”) was the brother of Prometheus (traditionally interpreted as “foresight”, literally “fore-thinker”), a pair of Titans who “acted as representatives of mankind” (Kerenyi 1951, p 207). They were the sons of Iapetus,[1] who in other contexts was the father of Atlas. While Prometheus is characterized as ingenious and clever, Epimetheus is depicted as foolish.

According to Plato‘s use of the old myth in his Protagoras (320d–322a), the twin Titans were entrusted with distributing the traits among the newly created animals. Epimetheus was responsible for giving a positive trait to every animal, but when it was time to give man a positive trait, lacking foresight he found that there was nothing left.[2]

Prometheus decided that mankind’s attributes would be the civilizing arts and fire, which he stole from Zeus. Prometheus later stood trial for his crime. In the context of Plato’s dialogue, “Epimetheus, the being in whom thought follows production, represents nature in the sense of materialism, according to which thought comes later than thoughtless bodies and their thoughtless motions.”[3]

According to Hesiod, who related the tale twice (Theogony, 527ff; Works and Days 57ff), Epimetheus was the one who accepted the gift of Pandora from the gods. Their marriage may be inferred (and was by later authors), but it is not made explicit in either text.

In later myths, the daughter of Epimetheus and Pandora was Pyrrha, who married Deucalion, a descendant of Prometheus. Together they are the only two humans who survived the deluge.[4]

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Epimetheus_(mythology)

Personal Information

Epimetheus (Titan) of afterthought
Name Epimetheus (Titan) of afterthought
Parents

Siblings

Name Birth Death
Atlas (Titan) god of endurance & astronomyasdasds   
Prometheus (Titan) of forethought and crafty counsel, & creator of mankindasdasds   
Menoetius (Chthonic Deity & Titan) of violent anger, rash action, & human mortalityasdasds   

References   [ + ]

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures

Noah Moses

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