Apóllōn aka-Apollo (Twelve Olympians)

(Greek: Ἀπόλλων) (Latin: Apollo) (Translation: xxxx )


APOLLO: (Ἀπόλλων, Apóllōn)1)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures God of music, arts, knowledge, healing, plague, prophecy, poetry, manly beauty, and archery. He is the son of Zeus and Leto, and the twin brother of Artemis. Both Apollo and Artemis use a bow and arrow. Apollo is often incorrectly identified as the god of the sun. Although Apollo is the god of the sun in Roman mythology, Helios is the god of the sun in Greek mythology. In sculpture, Apollo is depicted as a very handsome, beardless young man with long hair and an ideal physique. As the embodiment of perfectionism, he could be cruel and destructive, and his love affairs were rarely happy. He often appears in the company of the Muses. His attributes include the laurel wreath and lyre. His sacred animals include roe deer, swans, cicadas, hawks, ravens, crows, foxes, mice, and snakes. His Roman counterpart is also named Apollo.


Apollo,_lira,_dan_angsaApollo:2)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo (Attic, Ionic, and Homeric Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun;Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo is the son of Zeus and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis. Apollo is known in Greek-influenced Etruscan mythology as Apulu.3)Krauskopf, I. 2006. “The Grave and Beyond.”The Religion of the Etruscans. edited by N. de Grummond and E. Simon. Austin: University of Texas Press. p. vii, p. 73-75.

As the patron of Delphi (Pythian Apollo), Apollo was an oracular god—the prophetic deity of the Delphic Oracle. Medicine and healing are associated with Apollo, whether through the god himself or mediated through his son Asclepius, yet Apollo was also seen as a god who could bring ill-health and deadly plague. Amongst the god’s custodial charges, Apollo became associated with dominion over colonists, and as the patron defender of herds and flocks. As the leader of the Muses(Apollon Musegetes) and director of their choir, Apollo functioned as the patron god of music and poetry. Hermes created the lyre for him, and the instrument became a common attribute of Apollo. Hymns sung to Apollo were called paeans.

In Hellenistic times, especially during the 3rd century BCE, as Apollo Helios he became identified among Greeks with Helios, Titan god of the sun, and his sister Artemis similarly equated with Selene, Titan goddess of the moon.4)For the iconography of the Alexander–Helios type, see H. Hoffmann, 1963. “Helios”, in Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 2, pp. 117–23; cf. Yalouris 1980, no. 42. In Latin texts, on the other hand, Joseph Fontenrose declared himself unable to find any conflation of Apollo with Sol among the Augustan poets of the 1st century, not even in the conjurations of Aeneas and Latinus in Aeneid XII (161–215).5)Joseph Fontenrose, “Apollo and Sol in the Latin poets of the first century BC”, Transactions of the American Philological Association 30(1939), pp 439–55; “Apollo and the Sun-God in Ovid”, American Journal of Philology 61 (1940) pp 429–44; and “Apollo and Sol in the Oaths of Aeneas and Latinus” Classical Philology 38.2 (April 1943), pp. 137–138. Apollo and Helios/Sol remained separate beings in literary and mythological texts until the 3rd century CE.


Consorts6)a wife, husband, or companion, in particular the spouse of a reigning monarch. and children: extended list

1.0 ACACALLIS

1.1 AMPHITHEMIS (Garamas)7)Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1491 ff

1.2 NAXOS, eponym of the island Naxos8)Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1491 ff

1.3 PHYLACIDES

1.4 PHYLANDER9)Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10. 16. 5

2.0 ACANTHA

3.0 AETHUSA

3.1 ELEUTHER

4.0 AGANIPPE

4.1 CHIOS10)Pseudo-Plutarch, On Rivers, 7. 1

5.0 ALCIOPE11)Photius, Lexicon s. v. Linos

5.1 LINUS (possibly)

6.0 AMPHISSA / ISSE, daughter of Macareus

7.0 ANCHIALE / Acacallis

7.1 OAXES12)Servius on Virgil‘s Eclogue 1, 65

8.0 AREIA, daughter of Cleochus / Acacallis / Deione

8.1 MILETUS

9.0 ASTYCOME, nymph

9.1 EUMOLPUS (possibly)13)Photius, Lexicon, s. v. Eumolpidai

10.0  ARSINOE, daughter of Leucippus

10.1 ASCLEPIUS (possibly)

10.2 ERIOPIS

11.0 BABYLO

11.1 ARABUS14)Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, 7. 56 – 57 p. 196

12.0 BOLINA

13.0 CALLIOPE, Muse

13.1 ORPHEUS (possibly)

13.2 LINUS (possibly)

13.3 IALEMUS

14.0 CASSANDRA

15.0 CASTALIA

16.0 CELAENO, daughter of Hyamus / MELAINA / THYIA

16.1 DELPHUS

17.0 CHIONE / PHILONIS / LEUCONOE

17.1 PHILAMMON

18.0 CHRYSORTHE

18.1 CORONUS

19.0 CHRYSOTHEMIS

19.1 PARTHENOS

20.0 CORONIS

20.1 ASCLEPIUS

21.0 CORYCEIA

21.1 LYCORUS (Lycoreus)

22.0 CREUSA

22.1 ION

23.0 CYRENE

23.1 ARISTAEUS

23.2 IDMON (possibly)

23.3 AUTUCHUS15)Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 2. 498

24.0 DANAIS, Cretan nymph

24.1 The Curetes16)Tzetzes on Lycophron, 77

25.0 DAPHNE

26.0 DIA, daughter of Lycaon

26.1 DRYOPS

27.0 DRYOPE

27.1 AMPHISSUS

28.0 EUBOEA (daughter of Macareus of Locris)

28.1 AGREUS

29.0 EVADNE, daughter of Poseidon

29.1 IAMUS

30.0 GRYNE

31.0 HECATE

31.1 SCYLLA (possibly)17)Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica4.828, referring to “Hesiod“, Megalai Ehoiai fr.

32.0 HECUBA

32.1 TROILUS

32.2 HECTOR (possibly)18)Tzetzes on Lycophron, 266

33.0 HESTIA (wooed her unsuccessfully)

34.0 HYPERMNESTRA, wife of Oicles

34.1 AMPHIARAUS (possibly)

35.0 HYPSIPYLE19)Arnobius, Adversus Nationes, 4. 26; not the same as Hypsipyle of Lemnos

36.0 HYRIA (Thyria)

36.1 CYCNUS

37.0 LYCIA, nymph or daughter of Xanthus

37.1 EICADIUS20)Servius on Aeneid, 3. 332

37.2 PATARUS21)Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Patara

38.0 MANTO

38.1 MOPSUS

39.0 MARPESSA

40.0 MELIA

40.1 ISMENUS22)Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 10. 5

40.2 TENERUS23)Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 26. 1

41.0 OCYRHOE

42.0 OTHREIS

42.1 PHAGER

43.0 PARNETHIA, nymph

43.1 CYNNES24)Photius, Lexicon, s. v. Kynneios

44.0 PARTHENOPE

44.1 LYCOMEDES

45.0 PHTHIA

45.1 DORUS

45.2 LAODOCUS

45.3 POLYPOETES

46.0 PROTHOE25)Arnobius, Adversus Nationes, 4. 26

47.0 PROCLEIA

47.1 TENES (possibly)

48.0 PSAMATHE

48.1 LINUS

49.0 RHOEO

49.1 ANIUS

50.0 RHODOESSA, nymph

50.1 CEOS, eponym of the island Ceos26)Etymologicum Magnum 507, 54, under Keios

51.0 RHODOPE

51.1 CICON, eponym of the tribe Cicones27)Etymologicum Magnum 513, 37, underKikones

52.0 SINOPE

52.1 SYRUS

53.0 STILBE

53.1 CENTAURUS

53.2 Lapithes

53.3 AINEUS

54.0 SYLLIS / HYLLIS

54.1 ZEUXIPPUS

55.0 THALEIA, Muse / RHETIA, nymph

55.1 The CORYBANTES

56.0 THEMISTO, daughter of Zabius of Hyperborea28)Stephanus of Byzantium, s. v. Galeōtai

56.1 GALEOTES

56.2 TELMESSUS (?)

57.0 THERO

57.1 CHAERON

58.0 URANIA, Muse

58.1 LINUS (possibly)

59.0 UREA, daughter of Poseidon

59.1 ILEUS (Oileus?)

60.0 Wife of ERGINUS

60.1 TROPHONIUS (possibly)

61.0 UNKNOWN CONSORTS

61.1 ACRAEPHEUS, eponym of the city Acraephia29)Stephanus of Byzantium, s. v. Akraiphia

61.2 CHARICLO (possibly)30)Scholia on Pindar, Pythian Ode 4. 181

61.3 ERYMANTHUS

61.4 MARATHUS, eponym of Marathon31)Suda s. v. Marathōn

61.5 MEGARUS32)Stephanus of Byzantium s. v Megara

61.6 MELANEUS

61.7 ONCIUS33)Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8. 25. 4 34)Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Ogkeion

61.8 PHEMONOE

61.9 PISUS, founder of Pisa in Etruria35)Servius on Aeneid, 10. 179

61.10 YOUNGER MUSES

61.10.1  CEPHISSO

61.10.2  APOLLONIS

61.10.3  BORYSTHENIS

Other male lovers of Apollo include:

Admetus36)Callimachus, Hymn to Apollo, 49. 37)Plutarch, Life of Numa, 4. 5.

Atymnius,38)Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 11. 258; 19. 181. otherwise known as a beloved of Sarpedon

Branchus (alternately, a son of Apollo)

Carnus

• Clarus39)Philostratus, Letters, 5. 3.

• Hippolytus of Sicyon (not the same as Hippolytus, the son of Theseus)40)Plutarch, Life of Numa, 4. 5.

Hymenaios41)Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses, 23.

Iapis

• Leucates, who threw himself off a rock when Apollo attempted to carry him off42)Servius on Aeneid, 3. 279.

Phorbas (probably the son of Triopas)43)Plutarch, Life of Numa, 4. 5, cf. also Hyginus,Poetical Astronomy, 2. 14.

• Potnieus44)Clement of Rome, Homilia, 5. 15.

 

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo

 

Personal Information

Apóllōn aka-Apollo (Twelve Olympians)
Name Apóllōn aka-Apollo (Twelve Olympians)
Parents
Wife 1Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Borysthenis ‘Younger Muses’
Wife 2Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Apollonis ‘Younger Muses’
Wife 3Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Cephisso ‘Younger Muses’
Wife 4Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Pisus
Wife 5Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Phemonoe
Wife 6Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Melaneus
Wife 7Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Megarus
Wife 8Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Marathus
Wife 9Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Erymanthus
Wife 10Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Chariclo
Wife 11Unknown (consort of Apollo) Mother of Acraepheus
Wife 12Unknown (consort of Apollo) Wife of Erginus
Wife 13Urea (consort of Apollo)
Wife 14Thero (consort of Apollo)
Wife 15Themisto (consort of Apollo)
Wife 16Thaleia aka-Rhetia (consort of Apollo) Nymph
Wife 17Syllis (consort of Apollo)
Wife 18Stilbe (consort of Apollo)
Wife 19Sinope (consort of Apollo)
ProfessionMajor gods and goddesses

Siblings

Name Birth Death
Artemis (Twelve Olympians)asdasds   

Half-Siblings

Name Birth Death
Sarpedon (son of Zeus)asdasds   
Perseus (son of Zeus)asdasds   
Lacedaemon (mythical King of Laconia)asdasds   
Epaphus aka. Apis (son of Zeus)asdasds   
Angelos (Chthonic Deity) underworld goddessasdasds   
Aiakos  (Chthonic Judge Deity) of the Deadasdasds   
Minos  (son of Zeus)asdasds   
Rhadamanthys ( son of Zeus) ( son of Zeus)asdasds   
Persephone (Chthonic Deity & Titaness) queen of the underworldasdasds   
Dionysus (Twelve Olympians)asdasds   
Hermes (Twelve Olympians)asdasds   
Hephaestus (Twelve Olympians)asdasds   
Ares (Twelve Olympians)asdasds   

Children

Name Birth Death
Syrus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Cicon aka-Kikon (son of Apollo) (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Anius (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Tenes aka-Tennes (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Polypoetes (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Laodocus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Dorus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Lycomedes (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Cynnes (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Phager (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Tenerus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Ismenus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Mopsus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Eicadius (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Patarus (child of Apollo)asdasds   
Cycnus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Troilus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Aristaeus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Lycorus aka-Lycoreus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Parthenos (daughter of Apollo)asdasds   
Coronus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Philammon (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Delphus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Ialemus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Orpheus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Arabus (child of Apollo)asdasds   
Eriopis (daughter of Apollo)asdasds   
Eumolpus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Miletus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Oaxes (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Linus (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Chios (child of Apollo)asdasds   
Eleuther (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Phylander (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Phylacides (son of Apollo)asdasds   
Naxos (child of Apollo)asdasds   
Amphithemis aka-Garamas (child of Apollo)asdasds   
Asclepius (son of Apollos)asdasds   

Children-in-Law

Name Birth Death
Epione (goddess of soothing of pain)asdasds   

Grand-Children

Name Birth Death
Hygieia (Goddess Health/Cleanliness/Sanitation)asdasds   

References   [ + ]

1. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures
2. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Apollo
3. Krauskopf, I. 2006. “The Grave and Beyond.”The Religion of the Etruscans. edited by N. de Grummond and E. Simon. Austin: University of Texas Press. p. vii, p. 73-75.
4. For the iconography of the Alexander–Helios type, see H. Hoffmann, 1963. “Helios”, in Journal of the American Research Center in Egypt 2, pp. 117–23; cf. Yalouris 1980, no. 42.
5. Joseph Fontenrose, “Apollo and Sol in the Latin poets of the first century BC”, Transactions of the American Philological Association 30(1939), pp 439–55; “Apollo and the Sun-God in Ovid”, American Journal of Philology 61 (1940) pp 429–44; and “Apollo and Sol in the Oaths of Aeneas and Latinus” Classical Philology 38.2 (April 1943), pp. 137–138.
6. a wife, husband, or companion, in particular the spouse of a reigning monarch.
7. Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1491 ff
8. Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 1491 ff
9. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 10. 16. 5
10. Pseudo-Plutarch, On Rivers, 7. 1
11. Photius, Lexicon s. v. Linos
12. Servius on Virgil‘s Eclogue 1, 65
13. Photius, Lexicon, s. v. Eumolpidai
14. Pliny the Elder, Naturalis Historia, 7. 56 – 57 p. 196
15. Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica, 2. 498
16. Tzetzes on Lycophron, 77
17. Scholia on Apollonius Rhodius, Argonautica4.828, referring to “Hesiod“, Megalai Ehoiai fr.
18. Tzetzes on Lycophron, 266
19. Arnobius, Adversus Nationes, 4. 26; not the same as Hypsipyle of Lemnos
20. Servius on Aeneid, 3. 332
21. Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Patara
22. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 10. 5
23. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 9. 26. 1
24. Photius, Lexicon, s. v. Kynneios
25. Arnobius, Adversus Nationes, 4. 26
26. Etymologicum Magnum 507, 54, under Keios
27. Etymologicum Magnum 513, 37, underKikones
28. Stephanus of Byzantium, s. v. Galeōtai
29. Stephanus of Byzantium, s. v. Akraiphia
30. Scholia on Pindar, Pythian Ode 4. 181
31. Suda s. v. Marathōn
32. Stephanus of Byzantium s. v Megara
33. Pausanias, Description of Greece, 8. 25. 4
34. Stephanus of Byzantium s. v. Ogkeion
35. Servius on Aeneid, 10. 179
36. Callimachus, Hymn to Apollo, 49.
37, 40. Plutarch, Life of Numa, 4. 5.
38. Nonnus, Dionysiaca, 11. 258; 19. 181.
39. Philostratus, Letters, 5. 3.
41. Antoninus Liberalis, Metamorphoses, 23.
42. Servius on Aeneid, 3. 279.
43. Plutarch, Life of Numa, 4. 5, cf. also Hyginus,Poetical Astronomy, 2. 14.
44. Clement of Rome, Homilia, 5. 15.

Noah Moses

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