Aphrodite (Twelve Olympians)

APHRODITE:1)http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Aphrodite.html (Transliteration: Aphroditê) (Greek: Αφροδιτη) (Latin: Aphrodite) (Translation: Venus) was the Olympian goddess of love, beauty, pleasure and procreation. She was depicted as a beautiful woman often accompanied by the winged godling Eros (Love). Her attributes included a dove, apple, scallop shell and mirror. In classical sculpture and fresco she was usually depicted nude.


Aphrodite:2)http://www.greekmythology.com/Olympians/Aphrodite/aphrodite.html was the goddess of love, desire and beauty. Apart from her natural beauty, she also had a magical girdle that compelled everyone to desire her.

There are two accounts of her birth. According to one, she was the daughter of Zeus and Dione, the mother goddess worshipped at the Oracls of Dodona. However, the other account, which is more prevalent, informs us that she arose from the sea on a giant scallop, after Cronus castrated Uranus and tossed his severed genitals into the sea. Aphrodite then walked to the shore of Cyprus. In a different version of the myth, she was born near the island of Cythera, hence her epithet “Cytherea”.

Aphrodite was married to Hephaestus; however, she had an affair with her brother Ares, god of war. When Hephaestus found out about the affair, he devised a plan and managed to humiliate his wife and her lover to the other Olympians. Her holy tree was the myrtle, while her holy birds were the dove, the swan, and the sparrow.

Aphrodite represented sex, affection, and the attraction that binds people together.

Aphrodite Is also called Venus, Afrodite.


Aphrodite: (Ἀφροδίτη, Aphroditē)3)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures Goddess of beauty, love, desire, and pleasure. Although married to Hephaestus she had many lovers, most notably Ares, Adonis, and Anchises. She was depicted as an extraordinarily beautiful woman, with poets praising the radiance of her smile in particular. Her symbols include roses and other flowers, the scallop shell, and the myrtle wreath. Her sacred animals include doves and sparrows. Her Roman counterpart is Venus.


240px-NAMA_Aphrodite_SyracuseAphrodite:4)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphrodite (i/æfrəˈdti/ af-rə-dy-tee; Greek: Ἀφροδίτη) is the Greek goddess of love, beauty, pleasure, and procreation. Her Roman equivalent is the goddess Venus.5)Larousse Desk Reference Encyclopedia, The Book People, Haydock, 1995, p. 215. She is identified with the planet Venus.

As with many ancient Greek deities, there is more than one story about her origins. According to Hesiod‘s Theogony, she was born when Cronus cut off Uranus‘s genitals and threw them into the sea, and she arose from the sea foam (aphros). According to Homer‘s Iliad, she is the daughter of Zeus and Dione. According to Plato (Symposium, 180e), these two origins were of entirely separate entities: Aphrodite Ourania and Aphrodite Pandemos.

Because of her beauty, other gods feared that their rivalry over her would interrupt the peace among them and lead to war, so Zeus married her to Hephaestus, who, because of his ugliness and deformity, was not seen as a threat. Aphrodite had many lovers—both gods, such as Ares, and men, such as Anchises. She played a role in the Eros and Psyche legend, and later was both Adonis‘s lover and his surrogate mother. Many lesser beings were said to be children of Aphrodite.

Aphrodite is also known as Cytherea (Lady of Cythera) and Cypris (Lady of Cyprus) after the two cult sites, Cythera and Cyprus, which claimed to be her place of birth. Myrtle, doves, sparrows, horses, and swans were said to be sacred to her. The ancient Greeks identified her with the Ancient Egyptian goddess Hathor.6)Reginald Eldred Witt, Isis in the ancient world (Johns Hopkins University Press) 1997:125. ISBN 0-8018-5642-6

Aphrodite had many other names, such as Acidalia, Cytherea, and Cerigo, each used by a different local cult of the goddess in Greece. The Greeks recognized all of these names as referring to the single goddess Aphrodite, despite the slight differences in what these local cults believed the goddess demanded of them. The Attic philosophers of the 4th century, however, drew a distinction between a celestial Aphrodite (Aphrodite Urania) of transcendent principles, and a separate, “common” Aphrodite who was the goddess of the people (Aphrodite Pandemos).


Sources: http://www.greekmythology.com/Olympians/Aphrodite/aphrodite.html

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphrodite

Sources: http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Aphrodite.html

Personal Information

Aphrodite (Twelve Olympians)
Name Aphrodite (Twelve Olympians)
Parents
ProfessionMajor gods and goddesses

Siblings

Name Birth Death
Meliae (consort of Apollo)asdasds   
Gigantes (Giants)asdasds   
Erinyes (Furies)asdasds   
Cyclopes (Giants)asdasds   
Hecatonchires (Centimanes)asdasds   
Titans (Primordial Deities)asdasds   

Half-Siblings

Name Birth Death
Kythonios (Gigantes)asdasds   
Picolous (Gigantes)asdasds   
Pelorus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Hippolytus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Hapladamas aka-Hoplodamus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Asterius, aka-Astarias, aka-Aster, aka-Asterus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Aristaeus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Thoon aka. Thoas (Gigantes)asdasds   
Theomises (Gigantes)asdasds   
Theodamas (Gigantes) (Gigantes)asdasds   
Skyeus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Rhoikos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Phoitos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Peloreus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Pankrates (Gigantes)asdasds   
Pallas (Gigantes)asdasds   
Ouranion (Gigantes)asdasds   
Mylinos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Molios (Gigantes)asdasds   
Mimon (Gigantes)asdasds   
Leon (Gigantes)asdasds   
Klytios aka. Clytius (Gigantes)asdasds   
Khthonios (Gigantes)asdasds   
Hyperbios (Gigantes)asdasds   
Hippolytos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Gration (Gigantes)asdasds   
Eurytos, aka-Euryalus, aka-Euryalos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Euboios (Gigantes)asdasds   
Ephialtes (Gigantes)asdasds   
Enkelados (Gigantes)asdasds   
Emphytos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Damysos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Damasen (Gigantes)asdasds   
Aristaios (Gigantes)asdasds   
Alcyoneus aka. Alkyoneus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Aigaion (Gigantes)asdasds   
Alektos aka. Allektos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Agrios aka. Agrius (Gigantes)asdasds   
Porphyrion (Gigantes)asdasds   
Polybotes (Gigantes)asdasds   
Mimas, aka-Mimos (Gigantes)asdasds   
Enceladus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Antaeus (Gigantes)asdasds   
Echidna (half-woman, half-snake)asdasds   
Typhon (Storms)asdasds   
Megaera (Chthonic Deity) goddesses of retributionasdasds   
Tisiphone (Chthonic Deity) goddesses of retributionasdasds   
Alecto (Chthonic Deity) goddesses of retributionasdasds   
Ourea (Primordial Deity) 10 gods of mountainsasdasds   
Iapetus (Titan) of mortalityasdasds   
Crius (Titan)asdasds   
Mnemosyne (Titaness) of memory & remembranceasdasds   
Themis (Titaness) of divine law and orderasdasds   
Cronus (Chthonic Deity & Titan) of the Harvestasdasds   
Rhea (Titaness) of fertilityasdasds   
Phoebe (Titaness) of intellect & prophecyasdasds   
Coeus (Titan) of intellect and the axis of heavenasdasds   
Hyperion (Titan) of lightasdasds   
Theia (Titaness) of sight and the shining light of the clear blue skyasdasds   
Oceanus (Titan Aquatic Deities)asdasds   
Tethys (Titaness) of fresh-water (Aquatic Primordial Deity)asdasds   
Uranus (Primordial Deity) god of the heavens (Father of the Titans)asdasds   
Tartarus aka. Tartaros (Abyss)asdasds   
Pontus (Primordial Deity) god of the seaasdasds   

Children

Name Birth Death
Harmonia (daughter of Ares)asdasds   

Grand-Children

Name Birth Death
Ino (daughter of Cadmus)asdasds   
Autonoë (daughter of Cadmus)asdasds   
Agave (daughter of Cadmus)asdasds   
Semele (daughter of Cadmus)asdasds   

Great-Grand-Children

Name Birth Death
Dionysus (Twelve Olympians)asdasds   

References   [ + ]

1. http://www.theoi.com/Olympios/Aphrodite.html
2. http://www.greekmythology.com/Olympians/Aphrodite/aphrodite.html
3. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures
4. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aphrodite
5. Larousse Desk Reference Encyclopedia, The Book People, Haydock, 1995, p. 215.
6. Reginald Eldred Witt, Isis in the ancient world (Johns Hopkins University Press) 1997:125. ISBN 0-8018-5642-6

Noah Moses

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *