3 Maccabees Chapter 05


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P. 166 – 170 Book 3 B.C. 170 [PDF: 216/220 of P.524]

CHAPTER 5

(i) Jason s cruelties, and death. Antiochus defeats the Jews, and plunders the temple.

1 About the same time Antiochus prepared his second[1]P. 166 Foot Note a. Compare Daniel xi. 29. Respecting his first expedition, which was in the preceding year, see 2 Mace. i. 17. expedition into Egypt: and then it 2 happened, that through all the city, for the space almost of forty days, there were seen horsemen[2]P. 166 Foot Note b. The ingenious and fanciful Dr. Darwin, in the additional notes to his ” Botanic ” Garden,” adduces this passage in proof of the antiquity of the appearance of … Continue reading running in the air, robed in cloth of gold, and armed with lances, like a band of soldiers ; and 3 troops of horsemen in array, encountering and running one against another, with shaking of p. 167 shields, and multitude of pikes, and drawing of swords, and casting of darts, and glittering of golden ornaments, and armour of all sorts. 4 Wherefore every man prayed, that that apparition might turn to good. 5 Now when there was gone forth a false rumour, as though Antiochus had been dead, Jason took not less than a thousand men, and suddenly made an assault upon the city : and they which were upon the walls, being drawn back, and the city at length taken, Menelaus fled into the castle. 6 But Jason slew his own citizens without mercy, (not considering that success against his own kindred would be the worst kind of success[3]P. 168 Foot Note c. The every- way unfortunate results of civil war are alluded to and deplored by more than one of the Greek and Latin poets. ; but thinking that he was erecting trophies over his enemies, and not over his own countrymen.) 7 Howbeit, for all this he obtained not the authority, but at the last received shame for the reward of his treason, and fled again[4]P. 168 Foot Note d. See above, ch. iv. 20. into the country of 8 the Ammonites. In the end therefore he had an unhappy return, being accused[5]P. 168 Foot Note e. The Greek text reads Gr. [ click on image to enlarge] ” shut up and watched :” but Grotius judges that the true reading is  [ click on image to enlarge] in this … Continue reading before Aretas the king of the Arabians, fleeing from city to city, pursued of all men, hated as a forsaker of the laws; and being had in abomination, as a public executioner of his country and countrymen, he 9 was cast out into Egypt. Thus he, who had driven many out of their country, perished in a strange land, retiring to the Lacedaemonians, and thinking there to find shelter, by reason of his p. 168 kindred. And he who had cast out many unburied, 10 had none to mourn for him, nor any solemn funerals at all, nor sepulchre with his fathers.

11 Now when this which was done came to the kings ear, he thought that Judaea had revolted : whereupon removing out of Egypt[6]P. 168 Foot Note f. Compare 2 Mace. i. 20. in a furious mind, he took the city by force of arms ; and 12 commanded his men of war to cut down unsparingly such as they met, and to slay such as went up upon the houses. Thus there was killing of young 13 and old, making away of men, women, and children, slaying of virgins and infants. And there 14 were destroyed within the space of three whole days, fourscore thousand ; whereof forty thousand were slain in the conflict ; and no fewer were sold than slain. Yet was he not content with this, but 15 presumed to go into the most holy temple of all the world ; having for his guide Menelaus, that traitor to the laws and to his country. And 16 taking the holy vessels with polluted hands, and with profane hands pulling down the things which had been dedicated by other kings to the augmentation, and glory, and honour of the place, he gave them away[7]P. 168 Foot Note g. Gr. [ click on image to enlarge] the sense is not perfectly clear.. And so haughty was Antiochus in 17 mind, not considering that the Lord was angry for a while for the sins of them who dwelt in the city, and therefore his eye was not upon the place. For had they not been formerly wrapped in many 18 sins, this man, as soon as he had come, had forthwith been scourged, and turned back from his presumption, as Heliodorus was. who was sent by Seleucus the king to inspect the treasury. 19 Nevertheless, p. 169 God did not choose the people for the place’s sake, but the place for the people’s sake. 20 And therefore the place itself, which was partaker with them of the adversity which happened to the nation, did afterward communicate in the benefits sent from the Lord : and as it was forsaken in the wrath of the Almighty, so again, the great Lord being reconciled, it was reestablished with all glory.

21 So when Antiochus had carried out[8]P. 169 Foot Note h. Compare 2 Mace. i. 23,24 of the temple a thousand and eight hundred talents, he departed in all haste unto Antiochia; weening in his pride to make the land navigable, and the sea passable on foot[9]P. 169 Foot Note i. Like another Xerxes ; whose attempts of this kind, at mount Athos and at the Hellespont, are recorded by Herodotus, book VII. ch. 22 —24 ; and 33—36.: such was the haughtiness of his mind. 22 And he left governors to vex the nation : at Jerusalem, Philip, for his country a Phrygian, and for manners more barbarous than he who placed him 23 there ; and at Garizim, Andronicus ; and besides, Menelaus, who, worse than all the rest, bare an heavy hand over the citizens, having a malicious 24 mind against his countrymen the Jews. He sent also that detestable ringleader Apollonius[10]P. 169 Foot Note k. Compare 2 Mace. i. 29-32., [B.C. 168.] with an army of two and twenty thousand, commanding him to slay all those who were in their best age, and to sell the women, and the 25 younger persons. Who coming to Jerusalem, and pretending peace, did forbear till the holy day of the sabbath ; when taking the Jews keeping holy day, he commanded his men to arm themselves. 26 And so lie slew all them which were gone to the p. 170 public worship ; and running through the city with weapons, slaughtered great multitudes. But 27 Judas Maccabaeus, with nine others, or thereabout, withdrew himself into the wilderness[11]P. XX Foot Note l. Compare 2 Mace. ii. 27—30; and lived in the mountains after the manner of beasts, with his company, who fed on herbs continually, that they might not be partakers of the pollution.


Original Source: Transcribed from PDF copy of Book "The Five Books of Maccabees in English. With Notes and Illustrations", by HENRY COTTON, D.C.L.(Sir) Archdeacon of Cashel, and Late Student of Christ Church, Oxford. Publication date 1832 | PDF


References

1 P. 166 Foot Note a. Compare Daniel xi. 29. Respecting his first expedition, which was in the preceding year, see 2 Mace. i. 17.
2 P. 166 Foot Note b. The ingenious and fanciful Dr. Darwin, in the additional notes to his ” Botanic ” Garden,” adduces this passage in proof of the antiquity of the appearance of the Northern Lights; of which phænomenon he considers this to be ” such a description as ” might probably be given by an ignorant and alarmed people.” (Note 1, on Meteors.) Josephus describes similar appearances in the heavens a short time previously to the destruction of Jerusalem by Titus. Compare 5 Macc. iii. 7.
3 P. 168 Foot Note c. The every- way unfortunate results of civil war are alluded to and deplored by more than one of the Greek and Latin poets.
4 P. 168 Foot Note d. See above, ch. iv. 20.
5 P. 168 Foot Note e. The Greek text reads Gr. [ click on image to enlarge] ” shut up and watched :” but Grotius judges that the true reading is  [ click on image to enlarge] in this lie is followed by Schleusner.
6 P. 168 Foot Note f. Compare 2 Mace. i. 20.
7 P. 168 Foot Note g. Gr. [ click on image to enlarge] the sense is not perfectly clear.
8 P. 169 Foot Note h. Compare 2 Mace. i. 23,24
9 P. 169 Foot Note i. Like another Xerxes ; whose attempts of this kind, at mount Athos and at the Hellespont, are recorded by Herodotus, book VII. ch. 22 —24 ; and 33—36.
10 P. 169 Foot Note k. Compare 2 Mace. i. 29-32.
11 P. XX Foot Note l. Compare 2 Mace. ii. 27—30

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