1 Maccabees Chapter 01 (from Five Books of Maccabees)


01 | 02 | 03 | 04 | 05 | 06 | 07 {End of Book I.}| 08 | 09  | 10  | 11  | 12  | 13  | 14  | 15  | 16  |


The First Book of Maccabees: Containing occurrences which took place at Jerusalem and Alexandria, during part of the Reign of Ptolemy Philopator, King of Egypt, between the years B.C. 217 and B.C. 209.

P. 1 – 6 Book 1 B.C. 217. [PDF: 51/56 of p.524]

CHAPTER I.

(i) Ptolemy defeats Antiochus. He visits Jerusalem ; and attempts to enter the Temple.

1 NOW[1]Foot note p. 1 a. (Grotius has remarked, that this book opens abruptly, as though it were part of some larger work ; and this idea appears to be confirmed by an expression occurring at ch.ii. 25. when Philopator[2]Foot note p. 1 b. Ptolemy Philopator, king of Egypt, the fourth of that family and name. learned from those who returned, [B.C. 217.] that Antiochus[3]Foot note p. 1 c. Antiochus the Great, king of Syria, the son of Seleucus Callinicus. had taken away the places[4]Foot note p. 1 d. Namely, Tyro, Seleucia, Ptolemais, Abila, Gadara, Seythopolis, and other towns ; as related by Polybius, lib. V. which had been under his dominion, he gave orders to all his forces, both 2 foot and horse, to march : and taking with him his sister Arsinoe, he proceeded as far as the parts about Raphia[5]Foot note p. 1 e. A town on the southern border of the Holy Land [Gr.https://fourcornerministries.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/1Macca-1-p.1-fn-e-001-00-20mm-h.fw_-300x11.png 300w, https://fourcornerministries.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/1Macca-1-p.1-fn-e-001-00-20mm-h.fw_-500x19.png 500w" sizes="(max-width: 524px) 100vw, 524px" /> click image to enlarge] (Polybius.) Coins struck here are still extant., where Antiochus and his army had pitched their camp. p. 2 But one Theodotus[6]Foot note p. 2 f. This individual, who here is so lightly spoken of, appears, from Polybius’s account, to have been a person of considerable importance. He was by birth an AEtolian, was … Continue reading, intending to complete a treacherous design which he had, took the best of the arms which Ptolemy had formerly intrusted to him, and approached by night to Ptolemy’s tent, as intending himself alone to kill him, and thereby to put an end to the war. But Dositheus, 4 called the son of Drimylus, by birth a Jew, but one who afterwards forsook his religion and estranged himself from the ordinances of his forefathers, taking Ptolemy out of the way, caused a certain obscure person[7]Foot note p. 2 g. Polybius relates in detail this attempt of Theodotus; adding, that he wounded two persons, and slew the king’s physician, who probably is the person here alluded … Continue reading to lodge there in his stead; who accordingly received that punishment which was intended for the other.

5 Now when a sharp battle took place, and success seemed rather to favour Antiochus[8]Foot note p. 2 h. In fact Ptolemy’s left wing had been vanquished and put to flight ; so that Antiochus, young and inexperienced in the field, was fully persuaded that the victory was … Continue reading, Arsinoe[9]Foot note p. 2 i. This princess is also mentioned by Polybius, as zealously assisting Ptolemy in the battle.  went frequently up and down among the troops ; and exhorted them with lamentation and tears, having her hair in disorder, to fight manfully for themselves and for their children and wives ; promising to give to every one, if they conquered, two p. 3 6  minae[10]Foot note p. 3 k. There is the Hebrew, the Attic, the Roman, and the Egyptian mina ; each differing from the others in value. If the last be the one here meant, as is most probable, it is … Continue reading of gold as a reward. By which means it came to pass that their enemies were destroyed[11]Foot note p. 3 l. The particular! of this battle of Raphia are well and minutely given by Polybius, lih. V. in the battle[12]Foot note p. 3 m. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] The reading has been questioned, but surely without reason. Every one remembers that [Gr.  click image to enlarge] is a classical expression, … Continue reading , and many of them were taken 7 prisoners also. Ptolemy [B.C. 216.] therefore, having overcome this treachery, determined to go and encourage the neighbouring cities[13]Foot note p. 3 n. Polybius is severe upon the tickle readiness with which these cities received and hailed the victor. ; by doing which, and by making presents to their temples, he made his subjects to be full of courage.

8 But when the Jews had sent to him some of their council[14]Foot note p. 3 o. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] a word which usually denotes the Roman senate, hut is used to express the Jewish Sanhedrin or Great Council, in these books, also in that of … Continue reading and elders, to salute him and to bring with them presents, and to congratulate with him on past events ; it came to pass that he felt a stronger desire to take a journey to them with all speed. 9 Now when he was come to Jerusalem, [B.C. 214.] he offered a sacrifice to the Most High God, and returned thanks, and did what was then proper in 10 that place[15]Foot note p. 3 p. Namely, in the court of the Gentiles.. Moreover, when he was on the spot, he was astonished at the diligence and decency there observed. And wondering at the good order p. 4 about the holy place, he took a design to manage matters so, that he might enter into the temple itself[16]Foot note p. 4 q. Here is meant the inmost recess, the Holy of Holies. But when they said that this could 11 not be done, because it was not lawful for even persons of their own nation to enter into that place ; no, not for all the priests themselves, but only for the superior of them all, the high priest, and even for him but once in a year :—he would by no means be dissuaded. And when the law[17]Foot note p. 4 r. And besides these ordinances of the Law of Moses, Antiochus the Great, in his benevolence towards the Jews, had issued a public decree that no foreigner should enter into the … Continue reading to this 12 effect was read in his presence, he would by no means cease offering himself: but said that he must go in; and “even if they are deprived of that honour, I must not be so deprived.” He asked also 13 this question—why none of those who attended any other temples hindered him from entering into them ? And when a certain person inadvertently 14 said, that this was an unlucky fiction[18]Foot note p. 4 s. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] The sense appears somewhat doubtful. Grotius would read [Gr.  click image to enlarge] for [Gr.   click image to enlarge] Crutwell … Continue reading of his : he answered, ” Now that this has been done, from 15 ” whatever cause it may, why shall I not enter at ” all events, whether you will or no ?” 

Then the priests fell down in their holy 16 garments, and prayed the Most High God to assist them in the present distress, and to avert the violence of him who was making this wicked attempt p. 5 upon them : and they filled the temple with cries 17 and tears. And they which were left in the city were troubled, and came running, as thinking the affair to be something new and wholly unexpected. 18 The virgins also, who were shut up[19]Foot note p. 5 t. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] called by Philo, [Gr.  click image to enlarge] Compare 2 Mace. iii. 19. in private chambers, together with their mothers, rushed out; and sprinkling ashes and dust upon their heads, filled 19 the streets with groans and lamentations. And those who lately were adorned in wedding garments, leaving their marriage-chambers”,[20]Foot note p. 5 u. [Gr. click image to enlarge] and that decent modesty which belonged to them, ran 20 about the city together in disorder. And as for the young children, both their mothers and nurses who had charge of them, left these, one in one place, one in another; some in their houses, others in the streets, without any regard : and went in 21 troops together to the most high temple. And various was the prayer of the whole company on 22 account of this his unhallowed attempt. Together with these were the bolder citizens, who would not bear his persevering in the business, and his 23 resolution to effect his purpose. And crying out, that they must arm themselves for this onset, and courageously die for the Law of their fathers, they occasioned no small stir[21]Foot note p. 5 x. Or, contusion. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] as in Homer,  [Gr. click image to enlarge] II. B. 95. in the place: and having with difficulty been dissuaded by the seniors[22]Foot note p. 5 y.  [Gr. click image to enlarge] ; whom Grotius conceives to be the members of the council or Sanhedrim and elders, at last these also retired to the same station of prayer.

24 As for the multitude, they continued as before, 25 in the same manner, praying. While the elders p. 6 who were about the king tried in many ways to divert his proud mind from his intended purpose. But he, in a haughty manner, and disdaining[23]Foot note p. 6 z. Or, ” sending them all aside :” or, ” dismissing all other considerations :”  [Gr.  click image to enlarge] all 26 their persuasions, began now to make an advance; as thinking to accomplish his declared design. Which, when his attendants perceived, even they 27 turned to join with our people in calling upon Him who has all power, to give help in the present distress, and not to overlook this lawless and proud behaviour.

Now from the reiterated and vehement cry of 28 the multitude united together there was an inconceivable sort of noise[24]Foot note p. 6 a.  [Gr.   click image to enlarge]  Homer uses a similar expression, [Gr. click image to enlarge].: for one might suppose 29 that not the men alone, but the very walls and the ground echoed again ; as if the whole multitude at that time chose to die rather than that place should be profaned. 


Original Source: Transcribed from PDF copy of Book "The Five Books of Maccabees in English. With Notes and Illustrations", by HENRY COTTON, D.C.L.(Sir) Archdeacon of Cashel, and Late Student of Christ Church, Oxford. Publication date 1832 | PDF


References

1 Foot note p. 1 a. (Grotius has remarked, that this book opens abruptly, as though it were part of some larger work ; and this idea appears to be confirmed by an expression occurring at ch.ii. 25.
2 Foot note p. 1 b. Ptolemy Philopator, king of Egypt, the fourth of that family and name.
3 Foot note p. 1 c. Antiochus the Great, king of Syria, the son of Seleucus Callinicus.
4 Foot note p. 1 d. Namely, Tyro, Seleucia, Ptolemais, Abila, Gadara, Seythopolis, and other towns ; as related by Polybius, lib. V.
5 Foot note p. 1 e. A town on the southern border of the Holy Land [Gr.https://fourcornerministries.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/1Macca-1-p.1-fn-e-001-00-20mm-h.fw_-300x11.png 300w, https://fourcornerministries.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/1Macca-1-p.1-fn-e-001-00-20mm-h.fw_-500x19.png 500w" sizes="(max-width: 524px) 100vw, 524px" /> click image to enlarge] (Polybius.) Coins struck here are still extant.
6 Foot note p. 2 f. This individual, who here is so lightly spoken of, appears, from Polybius’s account, to have been a person of considerable importance. He was by birth an AEtolian, was high in the confidence of Ptolemy, by whom he was advanced to posts of the utmost consequence, and at length was made governor of Coelesyria. Having from some cause incurred the king’s ill graces, and suspecting that his life was in danger, he took the resolution of separating himself from his former master, and thenceforth espoused the interests of king Antiochus. See Polybius, V. 40, and 61
7 Foot note p. 2 g. Polybius relates in detail this attempt of Theodotus; adding, that he wounded two persons, and slew the king’s physician, who probably is the person here alluded to. Polyb. V. 81.
8 Foot note p. 2 h. In fact Ptolemy’s left wing had been vanquished and put to flight ; so that Antiochus, young and inexperienced in the field, was fully persuaded that the victory was his own: nor was he undeceived till it was too late to repair the disaster.
9 Foot note p. 2 i. This princess is also mentioned by Polybius, as zealously assisting Ptolemy in the battle.
10 Foot note p. 3 k. There is the Hebrew, the Attic, the Roman, and the Egyptian mina ; each differing from the others in value. If the last be the one here meant, as is most probable, it is equivalent to thirty-two Hebrew shekels (or eight ounces) of gold : so that two such mina- would he worth, in OUT present money, about sixty guineas.
11 Foot note p. 3 l. The particular! of this battle of Raphia are well and minutely given by Polybius, lih. V.
12 Foot note p. 3 m. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] The reading has been questioned, but surely without reason. Every one remembers that [Gr.  click image to enlarge] is a classical expression, used by Polybius and other Greek writers. Of the same class is [Gr.  click image to enlarge] which we find in Diodorus Siculus.
13 Foot note p. 3 n. Polybius is severe upon the tickle readiness with which these cities received and hailed the victor.
14 Foot note p. 3 o. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] a word which usually denotes the Roman senate, hut is used to express the Jewish Sanhedrin or Great Council, in these books, also in that of Judith, and by Josephus.
15 Foot note p. 3 p. Namely, in the court of the Gentiles.
16 Foot note p. 4 q. Here is meant the inmost recess, the Holy of Holies.
17 Foot note p. 4 r. And besides these ordinances of the Law of Moses, Antiochus the Great, in his benevolence towards the Jews, had issued a public decree that no foreigner should enter into the temple without their will and permission. Joseph. Ant. XII. .3.
18 Foot note p. 4 s. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] The sense appears somewhat doubtful. Grotius would read [Gr.  click image to enlarge] for [Gr.   click image to enlarge] Crutwell translates the passage, ” that it was monstrously wicked.” The sense seems to be, that “this very thing,” viz. his entering into other temples, ” was improperly done,” [Gr.  click image to enlarge] Or, ” that they minded their business badly in thus allowing him to go in.”
19 Foot note p. 5 t. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] called by Philo, [Gr.  click image to enlarge] Compare 2 Mace. iii. 19.
20 Foot note p. 5 u. [Gr. click image to enlarge]
21 Foot note p. 5 x. Or, contusion. [Gr.  click image to enlarge] as in Homer,  [Gr. click image to enlarge] II. B. 95.
22 Foot note p. 5 y.  [Gr. click image to enlarge] ; whom Grotius conceives to be the members of the council or Sanhedrim
23 Foot note p. 6 z. Or, ” sending them all aside :” or, ” dismissing all other considerations :”  [Gr.  click image to enlarge]
24 Foot note p. 6 a.  [Gr.   click image to enlarge]  Homer uses a similar expression, [Gr. click image to enlarge].

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *