5 Maccabees Chapter 00.01 (from The Five Books of Maccabees) OUTLINE (In Brief version):

The fifth book, although Calmet supposes that it was originally written in Hebrew, and from thence was translated into Greek, is not now known to exist in either of those languages. We have it in Arabic, and also in Syriae. It is a kind of Chronicle of Jewish affairs, commencing with the attempt on the treasury at Jerusalem made by Heliodorus, (with an interpolation of the history of the Septuagint version composed by desire of Ptolemy,) and reaching down to the birth of Jesus Christ : or, speaking accurately, to that particular point of time, at which Herod, almost glutted with the noblest blood of the Jews, turned his murderous hands upon the members of his own family ; and completed the sad tragedy of the Asmonaean princes, by the slaughter of his own wife Mariamne, her mother, and his own two sons.

The Arabic of this book, with a Latin version of it by Gabriel Sionita, first appeared in the Paris Polyglott Bible of Le Jay, with no other notice than the following preface. Liber hic a 1)English translation: This book bycap. 1 usque ad 16 inclusive inscribitur II2)English translation: This book should be a “ch. 1 and 16 inclusive, entitled 2Machabaeorum ex Hebraeorum translatione  uti in calce ejusdem cap. 16 videre est. Reliquus vero liber simpliciter notatur ‘ II.3)English translation: To use at the end of the translation of the Maccabees, from the verse of the chapter of the Hebrews. 16 to see it. The rest of the book is simply indicated ‘2. Machaeorum continuata tamen cum antecedentibus capitum serie. At cum neque textui Syriaco, qui praecipuae inter Orientales auctoritatis est, neque Graeco, neque Vulgatae editioni consonet, (quanquam in omnibus ferme Orientalium extet codicibus,)4)English translation: However machaeris continuous contact with the antecedents of the heads of the series. But since they are neither made to the text To the Syrian, who are of pre-eminent among the Eastern Churches of the authority of none, neither the Greek, nor the Vulgate, in harmony with that edition, (although this is, in almost all the Orientals, there is a plain bark of trees,). ilium in calce horum Bibliorum reposuimus, et quidem destitutum apicibus suis : tum ne cuiquam inter caeteros Canonicos libros recenseri a nobis videatur5)English translation: of the Bible have replaced him at the end of these things, and, indeed, destitute of the apices of: me to recount from the books of our own wishes as well as to prevent anyone from among the rest of the canons; : tum quia secundus Machabaeorum, qui pro Canonico habetur, ex integro nobis extat, quanquam sub nomine primi. Habes tamen in hoc quaedam ex primo et secundo; quaedam vero alia hactenus forte in lucem non edia quae tibi non injucunda fore speramus6)English translation: as well as because this second mode of the Maccabees, who, on behalf of the canon of the it is through, again we are the briny deep, although under the name of the first. Do you have a kind of from the first and the second time, even in this; edia has not hitherto happened to be in the light of the other things that some of it would be, we hope that it is not to be unpleasantquandoquidem liber totus est quaedam historiae continuatio, ab ipsis Machabaeis deducta usque ad regnum Herodis et praefecturam Pilati7)p. 32 Foot note c. This appears to be a mistake, as will be perceived on referring to the note on chap. lix. verse 25.et consequenter Christi Domini tempora. Tandem hoc unum scias velimus, nos ea bona fide textum expressisse, ut ne ea quidem quae facile emendari poterant mutaverimus.8)English translation: Since the whole book is a kind of history continuation of the Maccabees was established during the reign of Herod and the prefecture of the ball, and consequently the time of Christ. At last, we want to know this one thing, we did believe that, in good faith to be expressed by the text, which can easily be corrected, could not, indeed, as not to be, I have improved.

The appearance of this book in the Paris Polyglott, without any account of the Manuscript from which it had been taken, or any farther particulars connected with its publication, is thought to have arisen from the quarrels which were continually taking place between two of the editors of the Oriental department of that Bible, Gabriel Sionita and Abraham Ecchellensis. From the Paris edition it was copied into the London Polyglott of Bishop Walton.

Its author is wholly unknown. He may have been contemporary with Josephus, but was not Josephus himself; as may be proved by many differences from that historian, and some contradictions of him, collected instances of which may be seen in Calmet. That he lived after the capture of Jerusalem by Titus may be evidenced by the expression occurring at chap. ix. ” till after “the third captivity:” and again, in chap. xxi. “till the destruction of the second House.” It has been supposed to have been compiled from the Acts of each successive high priest. In three places, chap. xxv. 5, lv. 25, and lix. 96, mention is made of ” the author of this book ;” but who is the person designated by this expression, it is not perhaps easy to say.

The book contains some remarkable peculiarities of language ; such as “The House of God,” and “The Holy House,” for the Temple: —”the land of the Holy House,” for Judea :—”the city of the Holy House,” for Jerusalem :— the exclamations, “to whom be peace !” and “God be merciful to them,” used in speaking of the dead : —”the men of the west :”— the “great and good God,” (answering to the “Deus Optimus Maximus” of Roman authors.) and the same expression is found in the Samaritan Chronicle :—”the land of the sanctuary :” in the Samaritan Chronicle Jerusalem is called “the sanctuary,” and its king, “the king of the sanctuary.

I may here remark, in passing, that this Samaritan Chronicle exists in an Arabic translation, made from the Hebrew, but in the ancient Samaritan characters, in a manuscript which formerly belonged to the learned Joseph Scaliger, and is now preserved in the public library at Leyden. It begins from the death of Moses, (whence it obtained the title of ” the book of Joshua,”) and ends with the emperor Antonine. I am not aware that it has ever been published ; but Hottinger has given an epitome of it in his “Exercitationes Anti-morinianae,9)English translation: An anti-Morinianæ10)4to. 1644 ; and several extracts in his “Smegma Orientate11)English translation: soap Orientale,”12)4to. 1658: it is also briefly mentioned by Basnage, in his “History of the Jews,”13)II. i. 2.

The learned Dr. Huntington, who about a hundred and thirty years ago travelled into the Bast, and visited the town of Sichem, where he found only small and miserable remains of the Samaritans, saw there a ” Samaritan Chronicle” different from that which is mentioned by Scaliger, and less copious, but still embracing the period from the Creation to the time of Mahomet.

This book he brought over with him to England, and it is now deposited among the Huntington MSS. in the Bodleian library. A chronological abstract of it appears in the “Acta Eruditorum” for 1691 ‘ where it seems to have been continued by some unknown hand down to the year of Christ 1492.

In the “Biblia Maxima” by Jo. de la Haye,14)19 tom, folio, Paris, 1660 the Latin version of Le Jay’s Polyglott is reprinted, but with the omission of the first nineteen chapters.

A French translation of this fifth book, from the Arabic, appears, with other apocryphal writings, in the Appendix to De Sacy’s Bible : and Calmet has given a version of a portion of it, viz. of chapters xx to xxvi ; being so much as contains the acts of John Hyrcanus, namely, that part only which Sixtus Senensis had seen, and had considered to be the legitimate fourth book. He adds, that the entire book had been recently published in French by M. Baubrun, in the third volume of Le Maitre’s Bible, fol. Paris.15)Henry Cotton: This I have not seen.

I do not know that it has hitherto appeared in English. I have rendered it from the Latin version of the Arabic text printed in the Polyglotts ; taking care to adhere as closely as possible to my copy, lest a translation of a translation should be found to have wholly lost sight of the Original, if too much liberty were allowed; only endeavouring, as before stated, that the English should bear some resemblance to that of the other
Maccabaic books.

In the several notes and illustrations from heathen authors subjoined to the text, I have thrown upon various parts of it whatever light I was able to procure. But at the same time I have been unwilling to quote at length the corresponding passages of those authors, lest the volume should be swelled to a bulk disproportionate to its worth.
Source of comments16)p.30 [PDF: 34/524] THE FIVE BOOKS OF MACCABEES BY HENRY COTTON, D.C.L.

CHAPTER 01.
(i.) The attempt of Heliodorus on the treasury.
P. 277 – 281 Book 5 B.C. 184 [PDF: 327/331 of p.524]

CHAPTER 02.
(i.) The history of the translation of the twenty-four books out of the Hebrew tongue into the Greek tongue, for Ptolemy king of Egypt.
P. 281 – 284 Book 5 B.C. 284 [PDF: 331/334 of p.524]

CHAPTER 03.
(i.) The history of the Jews. A relation of what befell the Jews under king Antiochus; and what battles took place between them and his captains; and to what lengths he at last proceeded.
P. 284 – 286 Book 5 B.C. 170 [PDF: 334/336 of p.524]

CHAPTER 04.
(i.) The history of the death of Eleazar the priest.
P. 286 – 288 Book 5 B.C. 169 [PDF: 336/338 of p.524]

CHAPTER 05.
(i.) The history of’ the death of the seven brethren.
P. 288 – 294 Book 5 B.C. 167 [PDF: 338/344 of p.524]

CHAPTER 06.
(i.) The history of Mattathias the high priest, the son of’ Jochanan, who is the son of Hesmai the priest.
P. 294 – 297 Book 5 B.C. 167 [PDF: 344/347 of p.524]

CHAPTER 07.
(i.) The account of the death of Mattathias, and the acts of Judas his son after him.
P. 297 – 301 Book 5 B.C. 166 [PDF: 347/351 of p.524]

CHAPTER 08.
(i.) The relation of Antiochus’ return, and of his going into the land of Judah, and of the disease which fell on him, of which he died in his journey.
P. 301 – 303 Book 5 B.C. 164 [PDF: 351/353 of p.524]

CHAPTER 09.
(i.) The history of the eight days of dedication.
P. 304 – 305 Book 5 B.C. 165 [PDF: 354/355 of p.524]

CHAPTER 10.
(i.) The history of Judas battles with Gorgias and Ptolemy.
P. 305 – 309 Book 5 B.C. 164 [PDF: 355/359 of p.524]

CHAPTER 11.
(i.) The relation of the battle between Judas and Lysias the general of Etipator, after the death of king Antiochus.
P. 309 – 311 Book 5 B.C. 163 [PDF: 359/361 of p.524]

CHAPTER 12.
(i.) An account of the beginning of the power of the Romans, and of the enlargement of their empire.
P. 311 – 315 Book 5 B.C. 163 [PDF: 361/365 of p.524]

CHAPTER 13.
(i.) An account of the letter of the Romans to Judas, and of the treaty which tool: place between them.
P. 315 – 316 Book 5 B.C. 161 [PDF: 365/366 of p.524]

CHAPTER 14.
(i.) An account of the battle which took place between Judas, Ptolemy, and Gorgias.
P. 317 – 317 Book 5 B.C. 163 [PDF: 367/367 of p.524]

CHAPTER 15.
(i.) An account of the dissolution of the treaty which Antiochus had made with Judas, and of his march (together with Lysias his cousins soil) with a great army, and of his wars.
P. 318 – 320 Book 5 B.C. 163 [PDF: 368/370 of p.524]

CHAPTER 16.
(i.) The history of the arrival at Antioch of Demetrius the son of Seleucus, and of his defeating Etipator.
P. 320 – 323 Book 5 B.C. 162 [PDF: 370/373 of p.524]

CHAPTER 17.
(i.) An account of the death of Judas.
P. 323 – 325 Book 5 B.C. 161 [PDF: 373/375 of p.524]

CHAPTER 18.
(i.) The history of Jonathan the son of’ Mattathias.
P. 325 – 326 Book 5 B.C. 160 [PDF: 375/376 of p.524]

CHAPTER 19.
(i.) The history of Simeon the son of Mattathias
P. 327 – 328 Book 5 B.C. 144 [PDF: 377/378 of p.524]

CHAPTER 20.
(i.) The history of’ Hyrcanus the son of Simeon.
P. 328 – 330 Book 5 B.C. 135 [PDF: 378/380 of p.524]

CHAPTER 21.
(i.) The history of the going up of Antiochus to the city of the Holy House, to fight with Hyrcanus.
P. 331 – 335 Book 5 B.C. 134 [PDF: 381/385 of p.524]

CHAPTER 22.
(i.) The copy of the Romans’ letter to Hyrcanus.
P. 335 – 336 Book 5 B.C. 127 [PDF: 385/386 of p.524]

CHAPTER 23.
(i.) The history of the wars of Hyrcanus with the Samaritans.
P. 336 – 338 Book 5 B.C. 126 [PDF: 386/388 of p.524]

CHAPTER 24.
(i.) The history of Lythras the son of Cleopatra, and of his marching out against his mother in Egypt.
P. 338 – 339 Book 5 B.C. 105 [PDF: 388/389 of p.524]

CHAPTER 25.
(i.) An account of the Jewish sects at this time.
P. 339 – 340 Book 5 B.C. 108 [PDF: 389/390 of p.524]

CHAPTER 26.
(i.) The account of Hyrcanus’ death, and of the time of his reign.
P. 340 – 341 Book 5 B.C. 107/6 [PDF: 390/391 of p.524]

CHAPTER 27.
(i.) The history of Aristobuhis the son of Hyrcanus
P. 341 – 345 Book 5 B.C. 106/5 [PDF: 391/395 of p.524]

CHAPTER 28.
(i.) The account of Alexander the son of Hyrcanus.
P. 345 – 350 Book 5 B.C. 105 [PDF: 395/400 of p.524]

CHAPTER 29.
(i.) An account of the battles which took place between the Pharisees and Sadducees.
P. 350 – 352 Book 5 B.C. 94 [PDF: 400/402 of p.524]

CHAPTER 30.
(i.) The account of the death of Alexander the son of Hyrcanus.
P. 352 – 354 Book 5 B.C. 81 [PDF: 402/404 of p.524]

CHAPTER 31.
(i.) The history of queen Alexandra.
P. 354 – 355 Book 5 B.C. 77 [PDF: 404/405 of p.524]

CHAPTER 32.
(i.) An account of the things which were done to the Sadducees by the Pharisees in the time of Alexandra.
P. 355 – 356 Book 5 B.C. 71 [PDF: 405/406 of p.524]

CHAPTER 33.
(i.) The account of the death of Alexandra.
P. 357 – 358 Book 5 B.C. 70 [PDF: 407/408 of p.524]

CHAPTER 34.
(i.) The account of Aristobulus’ attack on his brother Hyrcanus, after Alexandra’s death.
P. 358 – 359 Book 5 B.C. 67 [PDF: 408/409 of p.524]

CHAPTER 35.
(i.) The account of Antipater, (that is, Herod the king,) and of the seditions and battles which he kindled between Hyrcanus and Aristobidus.
P. 359 – 363 Book 5 B.C. 67 [PDF: 409/413 of p.524]

CHAPTER 36.
(i.) The history of Gneus, general of the army of the Romans.
P. 364 – 371 Book 5 B.C. 64 [PDF: 414/421 of p.524]

CHAPTER 37.
(i.) The account of the appointment of ‘Hyrcanus the son of Alexander to be king of the Jews, and of the return to Rome of the general of the Roman army.
P. 371 – 372 Book 5 B.C. 63 [PDF: 421/422 of p.524]

CHAPTER 38.
(i.) The history of Alexander the son of Aristobulus.
P. 372 – 372 Book 5 B.C. 62 [PDF: 422/422 of p.524]

CHAPTER 39.
(i.) The history of Gabinius and of’ Alexander the son of Aristobulus.
P. 373 – 374 Book 5 B.C. 57 [PDF: 423/424 of p.524]

CHAPTER 40.
(i.) The history of the flight of Aristobulus and his son Antigonus from Rome, and their return into the land of Judah: also, an account of the death of Aristobulus.
P. 374 – 376 Book 5 B.C. 56 [PDF: 424/426 of p.524]

CHAPTER 41.
(i.) The history of Crassus.
P. 377 – 379 Book 5 B.C. 54 [PDF: 427/429 of p.524]

CHAPTER 42.
(i.) The history of Caesar, king of the Romans.
P. 379 – 382 Book 5 B.C. 52 [PDF: 429/432 of p.524]

CHAPTER 43.
(i.) The account of the coming of’ Antigonus the son of Aristobulus unto Caesar, complaining of Antipater who had caused his father’s death.
P. 382 – 383 Book 5 B.C. 47 [PDF: 432/433 of p.524]

CHAPTER 44.
(i.) The account of the embassy of ‘Hyrcanus to Caesar; asking for a renewal of the treaty between them; and of the copy of the treaty which Hyrcanus sent to him.
P. 384 – 386 Book 5 B.C. 45 [PDF: 434/436 of p.524]

CHAPTER 45.
(i.) The history of’ Caesar’s death.
P. 386 – 387 Book 5 B.C. 44 [PDF: 436/437 of p.524]

CHAPTER 46.
(i.) The history of the death of Antipater.
P. 387 – 388 Book 5 B.C. 43 [PDF: 437/438 of p.524]

CHAPTER 47.
(i.) The history of the death of Malchiah.
P. 388 – 390 Book 5 B.C. 42 [PDF: 438/440 of p.524]

CHAPTER 48.
(i.) The history of Octavian, (the same is Augustus the son of Caesars brother,) and of Antony, general of his army, and of Cassias’ death.
P. 390 – 394 Book 5 B.C. 41 [PDF: 440/444 of p.524]

CHAPTER 49.
(i.) The history of Antigonus the son of Aristobulus, and of his expedition against his uncle Hyrcanus: and of the succour which was obtained from the king of the Persians.
P. 394 – 398 Book 5 B.C. 40 [PDF: 444/448 of p.524]

CHAPTER 50.
(i.) The history of’ Herod when the Romans appointed him king- over the Jews, and his departure from Rome with an army to fight against the Holy House.
P. 398 – 400 Book 5 B.C. 40 [PDF: 448/450 of p.524]

CHAPTER 51.
(i.) The history of the magnanimity of certain of Herod’s men, and of their bravery.
P. 400 – 402 Book 5 B.C. 39 [PDF: 450/452 of p.524]

CHAPTER 52.
(i.) An account of Antony’s return from the country of the Persians after killing the king’ of the Persians, and his meeting with Herod.
P. 402 – 406 Book 5 B.C. 39 [PDF: 452/456 of p.524]

CHAPTER 53.
(i.) The history of Herod after the death of’ Antigonus.
P. 406 – 407 Book 5 B.C. 37 [PDF: 456/457 of p.524]

CHAPTER 54.
(i.) The history of Hyrcanus the son of Alexander, the uncle of Antigonus, and of his return into Jerusalem at the request of Herod, and of the death to which he put him.
P. 407 – 412 Book 5 B.C. 37 [PDF: 457/462 of p.524]

CHAPTER 55.
(i.) The history of Aristobulus the son of Hyreanus.
P. 412 – 418 Book 5 B.C. 36 [PDF: 462/468 of p.524]

CHAPTER 56.
(i.) The history of Antony, and of his expedition, against Augustus, and of the aid which he asked from Herod. And an account of the earthquake which occurred in the land of Judah, and of the battle which took place between them and the Arabians.
P. 419 – 425 Book 5 B.C. 34 [PDF: 469/475 of p.524]

CHAPTER 57.
(i.) The history of Antony s battle with Augustus, and of the death of Antony, and of Herod’s going to Augustus.
P. 425 – 429 Book 5 B.C. 31 [PDF: 475/479 of p.524]

CHAPTER 58.
(i.) The history of the murder which Herod committed on his wife Mariamne.
P. 429 – 432 Book 5 B.C. 29 [PDF: 479/482 of p.524]

CHAPTER 59.
(i.) The history of the coming’ of the two sons of Herod, Alexander and Aristobulus, as soon as they heard that their mother had been put to death by Herod.
P. 432 – 446 Book 5 B.C. 16 [PDF: 482/496 of p.524]


Original Source: Transcribed from PDF copy of Book "The Five Books of Maccabees in English. With Notes and Illustrations", by HENRY COTTON, D.C.L.(Sir) Archdeacon of Cashel, and Late Student of Christ Church, Oxford. Publication date 1832 | PDF


References   [ + ]

1. English translation: This book by
2. English translation: This book should be a “ch. 1 and 16 inclusive, entitled 2
3. English translation: To use at the end of the translation of the Maccabees, from the verse of the chapter of the Hebrews. 16 to see it. The rest of the book is simply indicated ‘2.
4. English translation: However machaeris continuous contact with the antecedents of the heads of the series. But since they are neither made to the text To the Syrian, who are of pre-eminent among the Eastern Churches of the authority of none, neither the Greek, nor the Vulgate, in harmony with that edition, (although this is, in almost all the Orientals, there is a plain bark of trees,).
5. English translation: of the Bible have replaced him at the end of these things, and, indeed, destitute of the apices of: me to recount from the books of our own wishes as well as to prevent anyone from among the rest of the canons;
6. English translation: as well as because this second mode of the Maccabees, who, on behalf of the canon of the it is through, again we are the briny deep, although under the name of the first. Do you have a kind of from the first and the second time, even in this; edia has not hitherto happened to be in the light of the other things that some of it would be, we hope that it is not to be unpleasant
7. p. 32 Foot note c. This appears to be a mistake, as will be perceived on referring to the note on chap. lix. verse 25.
8. English translation: Since the whole book is a kind of history continuation of the Maccabees was established during the reign of Herod and the prefecture of the ball, and consequently the time of Christ. At last, we want to know this one thing, we did believe that, in good faith to be expressed by the text, which can easily be corrected, could not, indeed, as not to be, I have improved.
9. English translation: An anti-Morinianæ
10. 4to. 1644
11. English translation: soap Orientale
12. 4to. 1658
13. II. i. 2.
14. 19 tom, folio, Paris, 1660
15. Henry Cotton: This I have not seen.
16. p.30 [PDF: 34/524] THE FIVE BOOKS OF MACCABEES BY HENRY COTTON, D.C.L.

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