Pantaenus the Philosopher (Church Father)


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Saint Pantaenus the Philosopher (Greek: Πάνταινος; died c. 200)[1] was a Greek theologian and a significant figure in the Catechetical School of Alexandria from around AD 180. This school was the earliest catechetical school, and became influential in the development of Christian theology.

Pantaenus was a Stoic philosopher teaching in Alexandria. He converted to the Christian faith, and sought to reconcile his new faith with Greek philosophy. His most famous student, Clement, who was his successor as head of the Catechetical School, described Pantaenus as “the Sicilian bee”.[2] Although no writings by Pantaenus are extant,[3] his legacy is known by the influence of the Catechetical School on the development of Christian theology, in particular in the early debates on the interpretation of the Bible, the Trinity, and Christology. He was the main supporter of Serapion of Antioch for acting against the influence of Gnosticism.

Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pantaenus

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