Table of Contents (Finney-C-12.UP)

BY CHARLES G. FINNEY

FRONT PAGE: PG 1/1013

Lectures on Systematic Theology, Embracing Moral Government, the Atonement, Moral and Physical Depravity, Natural, Moral, and Gracious Ability, Repentance, Faith, Justification, Sanctification, &c.

By The Rev. Charles G. Finney, Professor of Theology in the Oberlin Collegiate Institute, Ohio, America. | The Whole Work Revised, Enlarged, And Partly Re-Written By The Author, During His Late Visit To England. | Edited and Revised, With an Introduction, By the Rev. George Redford, D.D., LL.D, Of Worcester. | London: William Tegg And Co., 85, Queen Street, Cheapside. 1851.


TABLE OF CONTENTS PG 2

[01] LECTURE: I. How We Attain To the Knowledge of Certain Truths

  • (I.) Truths which need proof.
  • (II.) Truths which need no proof.

[02] LECTURE: II. — Moral Government.

  • (I.) Definition of the term law.
  • (II.) Distinction between physical and moral law.
  • (III.) Attributes of Moral Law.

[03] LECTURE: III. — Moral Government–Continued.

  • (I.) Term Government Defined.
  • (II.) Distinction between Moral and Physical Government.
  • (III.) Fundamental Reason of Moral Government.
  • (IV.) Whose Right It Is To Govern.
  • (V.) What Is Implied In The Right To Govern?
  • (VI.) Limits Of The Right To Govern.
  • (VII.) What Is Implied In Moral Government?
  • (VIII.) Moral Obligation Defined.
  • (IX.) Conditions of Moral Obligation.

[04] LECTURE: IV. — Moral Government–Continued.

  • (I.) Man A Subject Of Moral Obligation.
  • (II.) Extent of Moral Obligation.

[05] LECTURE: V. — Foundation of Moral Obligation.

  • (I.) State What Is Intended By The Foundation, Or Ground Of Obligation.
  • (II.) Remind You Of The Distinction, Already Pointed Out, Between The Ground And Conditions Of Obligation.
  • (III.) Call Attention To The Points Of General Agreement Among Various Classes Of Philosophers And Theologians.
  • (IV.) Shew Wherein They Inconsistently, Disagree.
  • (V.) Point Out the Intrinsic Absurdity of the Various Conflicting Theories.
  • (VI.) Lastly. Show The Practical Tendency Of The Various Theories.

[06] LECTURE: VI. — Foundation of Moral Obligation. False Theories.

  • Right-Arianism

[07] LECTURE: VII. — Foundation of Moral Obligation.

  • Divine Moral Excellence Theory

[08] LECTURE: VIII. — Foundation of Moral Obligation.

  • Theory of Moral Order.
  • Theory of Nature and Relations.
  • Theory That the Idea of Duty Is the Foundation of Moral Obligation.
  • Complex Theory.

[09] LECTURE: IX. — Foundation of Obligation.

  • Complex Theory. (Cont.)

[10] LECTURE: X. — Foundation of Obligation.

  • Point Out The Intrinsic Absurdity Of The Various Conflicting Theories.

[11] LECTURE: XI.

  • Summing up.

[12] LECTURE: XII. — Foundation of Moral Obligation.

  • Lastly, Show The Practical Tendency Of The Various Theories.

[13] LECTURE: XIII. — Foundation of Moral Obligation

  • Practical Bearings of Different Theories

[14] LECTURE XIV. — Moral Government.

  • In What Sense Obedience To Moral Law Cannot Be Partial.

[15] LECTURE XV. — Moral Government.

  • (I.) In What Sense Obedience To Moral Law Can Be Partial.
  • (II.) The Government Of God Accepts Nothing As Virtue But Obedience To Moral Law.

[16] LECTURE XVI. — Moral Government

  • What Is Not Implied In Obedience To Moral Law?

[17] LECTURE XVII. — Moral Government.

  • What Is Implied In Obedience To The Moral Law?

[18] LECTURE XVIII. — Attributes of Love.

  • [i] What Is Implied In Obedience To The Law Of God?

[19] LECTURE XIX. — Attributes of Love.

  • What Is Implied In Entire Obedience To The Law Of God?

[20] LECTURE XX. — Attributes of Love.

  • [ii] What Is Implied In Obedience To The Law Of God?

[21] LECTURE XXI. — Attributes of Love.

  • What Is Implied In Obedience To Moral Law?

[22] LECTURE XXII. — Attributes of Love.

  • [iii] What Is Implied In Obedience To The Law Of God?

[23] LECTURE XXIII. — Attributes of Love.

  • [iv] What Is Implied In Obedience To The Law Of God?

[24] LECTURE XXIV. — Attributes of Love–Continued.

  • [v] What Is Implied In Obedience To the Law of God?

[25] LECTURE XXV. — Moral Government.

  • What Constitutes Disobedience To Moral Law?

[26] LECTURE XXVI. — Moral Government.

  • What Is Not Implied In Disobedience To Moral Law?

[27 ]LECTURE XXVII. — Attributes of Selfishness.

  • What Is Implied In Disobedience To Moral Law?

[28] LECTURE XXVIII. — Attributes of Selfishness.

  • What Is Implied In Disobedience To The Law Of God?

[29] LECTURE XXIX. — Attributes of Selfishness.

  • What Is Implied In Disobedience To The Law Of God?

[30] LECTURE XXX. — Attributes of Selfishness.

  • What Is Implied In Disobedience To The Law Of God?

[31] LECTURE XXXI. — Attributes of Selfishness.

  • What Is Implied In Disobedience To The Law Of God?

[32] LECTURE XXXII. — Moral Government.

  • (I.): A Return to Obedience to Moral Law Is, and Must Be, Under Every Dispensation of the Divine Government, the Unalterable Condition of Salvation.
  • (II.): Under A Gracious Dispensation, A Return To Obedience To Moral Law Is Not Dispensed With As The Condition Of Salvation, But That Obedience To Law Is Secured By The Indwelling Spirit And Grace Of Christ.

[33] LECTURE XXXIII. — Moral Government–Continued.

  • Sanctions of Moral Law, Natural and Governmental.

[34] LECTURE XXXIV. — Atonement.

  • (I.): Call Attention to Several Well-Established Principles of Government, In The Light Of Which Our Investigation Will Proceed.
  • (II.): Define The Term Atonement As Used In This Discussion.
  • (III.): Inquire Into The Teachings Of Natural Theology, Or Into The À Priori Affirmations Of Reason Upon This Subject.
  • (IV.): Show The Fact Of Atonement.
  • (V.): The Design of Atonement.
  • (VI.): Extent of Atonement.
  • (VII.): Answer Objections.

[35] LECTURE XXXV. — Extent of Atonement.

  • (VI.): Extent of Atonement.

[36] LECTURE XXXVI. — Human Government.

      Human Governments A Part Of the Moral Government of God.

  • (I.): Inquire Into The Ultimate End Of God In The Creation Of The Universe.
  • (II.):  Show That Providential And Moral Government Are Indispensable Means Of Securing This End.
  • (III.):  That Civil, And Family Governments Are Indispensable To The Securing Of This End; And Are, Therefore, Truly A Part Of The Providential And Moral Government Of God.
  • (IV.):  Inquire Into The Foundation Of The Right Of Human Governments.
  • (V.):  Point out The Limits, Or Boundaries, Of This Right.
  • (VI.):  Make Several Remarks Respecting Forms Of Government, The Right And Duty Of Revolution, &C.
  • (VII.):  Apply The Foregoing Principles To The Rights And Duties Of Governments And Subjects, In Relation To The Execution Of Necessary Penalties; The Suppression Of Mobs, Insurrections, Rebellion; And In Relation To War, Slavery, Sabbath Desecration, &C.

[37] LECTURE XXXVII. — Human Governments.

  • (VI.):  (Cont.) Make Several Remarks Respecting Forms Of Government, The Right And Duty Of Revolution, &C.

[38] LECTURE XXXVIII. — Moral Depravity.

  • (I.): Define The Term Depravity.
  • (II.): Point Out the Distinction between Physical and Moral Depravity.
  • (III.): Show Of What Physical Depravity Can Be Predicated.
  • (IV.): Of What Moral Depravity Can Be Predicated.
  • (V.): That Mankind Are Both Physically And Morally Depraved.
  • (VI.): That Subsequent To The Commencement Of Moral Agency, And Previous To Regeneration, The Moral Depravity Of Mankind Is Universal.
  • (VII.): That during the Above Period the Moral Depravity of Mankind Is Total.
  • (VIII.): The Proper Method of Accounting for the Universal Total Moral Depravity of the Unregenerate Moral Agents of Our Race.

[39] LECTURE XXXIX. — Moral Depravity.

  • (VIII.): (Cont.) the Proper Method of Accounting for the Universal Total Moral Depravity of the Unregenerate Moral Agents of Our Race.

[40] LECTURE XL. — Moral Depravity.

  • Further Examination Of The Arguments Adduced In Support Of The Position That Human Nature Is In Itself Sinful.

[41] LECTURE XLI. — Moral Depravity.

  • The Proper Method of Accounting for Moral Depravity

[42] LECTURE XLII. — Regeneration.

  • (I.): Point out The Common Distinction between Regeneration and Conversion.
  • (II.):  State the Assigned Reasons for This Distinction.
  • (III.):  State Objections to This Distinction.
  • (IV.):  Show What Regeneration Is Not.
  • (V.):  What It Is.
  • (VI.):  Its Universal Necessity.
  • (VII.):  Agencies Employed In It.
  • (VIII.):  Instrumentalities Employed In It.
  • (IX.):  That In Regeneration The Subject Is Both Active And Passive.
  • (X.):  What Is Implied In Regeneration?
  • (XI.):  Philosophical Theories of Regeneration.
  • (XII.):  Evidences of Regeneration.

[43] LECTURE XLIII. — Regeneration–Continued.

  • XI. Philosophical Theories of Regeneration.

[44] LECTURE XLIV. — Regeneration–Continued.

  • XII. (Cont.) Evidences of Regeneration

[45] LECTURE XLV. — Regeneration.

  • (III.): Wherein Saints And Sinners, Or Deceived Professors, Must Differ.

[46] LECTURE XLVI. — Regeneration.

  • In What Saints And Sinners Differ.

[47] LECTURE XLVII. — Regeneration–Continued.

  • Wherein saints and sinners differ

[48] LECTURE XLVIII. — Natural Ability.

  • (I.): President Edwards’s Notion of Natural Ability.
  • (II.):  That This Natural Ability Is No Ability At All.
  • (III.):  What Constitutes Natural Inability According To This School?
  • (IV.):  That This Natural Inability Is No Inability At All.
  • (V.):  That Natural Ability Is Properly Identical With Freedom Or Liberty Of Will.
  • (VI.):  That The Human Will Is Free, And Therefore Men Are Naturally Able To Obey God.

[49] LECTURE XLIX. — Moral Ability and Inability.

  • (I.): What Constitutes Moral Inability, According To Edwards And Those Who Hold With Him?
  • (II.):  That Their Moral Inability To Obey God Consists In Real Disobedience And A Natural Inability To Obey.
  • (III.):  That This Pretended Distinction Between Natural And Moral Inability Is Nonsensical.
  • (IV.):  What Constitutes Moral Ability According To This School?
  • (V.):  That Their Moral Ability To Obey God Is Nothing Else Than Real Obedience, And A Natural Inability To Disobey.

[50] LECTURE L. — Inability.

  • (I.): STATE WHAT I CONSIDER TO BE THE FUNDAMENTAL ERRORS OF EDWARDS AND HIS SCHOOL ON THE SUBJECT OF ABILITY.
  • (II.): STATE THE PHILOSOPHY OF THE SCHEME OF INABILITY WHICH WE ARE ABOUT TO CONSIDER.
  • (III.): CONSIDER ITS CLAIMS.

[51] LECTURE LI. — Gracious Ability.

  • (I.): I Will Show What Those Who Use This Phraseology Mean By A Gracious Ability.
  • (II.): That The Doctrine Of A Gracious Ability As Held By Those Who Maintain It Is An Absurdity.
  • (III.): In What Sense Of The Terms A Gracious Ability Is Possible.

[52] LECTURE LII. — The Notion of Inability.

  • Proper Method of Accounting for It.

[52] LECTURE LIII. —  N/A

[54] LECTURE LIV. — Repentance and Impenitence.

  • (I.): What Repentance Is Not?
  • (II.): What It Is.
  • (III.): What Is Implied In It.?
  • (IV.): What Impenitence Is Not?
  • (V.): What It Is.
  • (VI.): Some Things That Are Implied In Impenitence.
  • (VII.): Notice Some Of The Characteristics Or Evidences Of Impenitence.

[55] LECTURE LV. — Faith and Unbelief.

  • (I.): What Evangelical Faith Is Not?
  • (II.): What It Is.
  • (III.): What Is Implied In It.?
  • (IV.): What Unbelief Is Not?
  • (V.): What It Is.
  • (VI.): What Is Implied In Unbelief?
  • (VII.): Conditions of both Faith and Unbelief.
  • (VIII.): The Guilt of Unbelief.
  • (IX.): Natural and Governmental Results of Each.

[56] LECTURE LVI. — Justification.

  • (I.): What Gospel Justification Is Not?
  • (II.): What It Is.
  • (III.): Point out The Conditions of Gospel Justification.
  • (IV.): Show What Is; the Foundation of Gospel Justification.

[57] LECTURE LVII. — Sanctification.

  • (I.): Give Some Account Of The Recent Discussions That Have Been Had Upon This Question.
  • (II.): Remind You Of Some Points That Have Been Settled In This Course Of Study.
  • (III.): Define The Principal Terms To Be Used In This Discussion.
  • (IV.): Show What The Real Question Now At Issue Is.
  • (V.): That Entire Sanctification Is Attainable In This Life.
  • (VI.): Point out The Conditions of This Attainment.
  • (VII.): Answer Objections.
  • (VIII.): Conclude With Remarks.

[58] LECTURE LVIII. — Sanctification.

  • (II.): (Cont.) Remind You of Some Points

[59] LECTURE LIX. — Sanctification.

  • (V.): (Cont.) That Entire Sanctification Is Attainable In This Life.

[60] LECTURE LX. — Sanctification.

  • Bible argument.

[61] LECTURE LXI. — Sanctification.

  • Paul entirely sanctified.

[62] LECTURE LXII. — Sanctification.

  • (VI.): (Cont.) Point out The Conditions of This Attainment.

[63] LECTURE LXIII. — Sanctification.

  • Conditions of Entire Sanctification (Cont.)

[64] LECTURE LXIV. — Sanctification.

  • Conditions of Entire Sanctification (Cont.)

[65] LECTURE LXV. — Sanctification.

  • Conditions of Entire Sanctification (Cont.)

[66] LECTURE LXVI. — Sanctification.

  • Conditions of Entire Sanctification (Cont.)

[67] LECTURE LXVII. — Sanctification.

  • Conditions of Entire Sanctification (Cont.)

[68] LECTURE LXVIII. — Sanctification.

  • (VII.): (Cont.) Answer Objections.

[69] LECTURE LXIX. — Sanctification.

  • Tendency of the denial that Christians have valid grounds of hope that they should obtain a victory over sin in this life.

[70] LECTURE LXX. — Sanctification.

  • [i] Further Objections Answered.

[71] LECTURE LXXI. — Sanctification.

  • [ii] Further Objections Answered. (Cont.)

[72] LECTURE LXXII. — Sanctification.

  • [iii] Further Objections Answered. (Cont.)

[73] LECTURE LXXIII. — Sanctification.

  • Remarks

[74] LECTURE LXXIV. Election

  • (I.): I Shall Notice Some Points In Which There Is A General Agreement Among All Denominations Of Christians Respecting The Natural And Moral Attributes Of God.
  • (II.): What the Bible Doctrine of Election Is Not.
  • (III.): What It Is.
  • (IV.): I Shall Prove The Doctrine To Be True.
  • (V.): Show What Could Not Have Been The Reasons For Election.
  • (VI.): What Must Have Been The Reason?
  • (VII.): When The Election Was Made.
  • (VIII.): Election Does Not Render Means For The Salvation Of The Elect Unnecessary.
  • (IX.): Election Is The Only Ground Of Hope In The Success Of Means To Save The Souls Of Men.
  • (X.): Election Does Not Oppose Any Obstacle To The Salvation Of The Non-Elect.
  • (XI.): There Is No Injustice In Election.
  • (XII.): This Is The Best That Could Be Done For The Inhabitants Of This World.
  • (XIII.): How We May Ascertain Our Own Election.

[75] LECTURE LXXV. Reprobation

  • (I.): What the True Doctrine of Reprobation Is Not.
  • (II.): What It Is.
  • (III.): That It Is A Doctrine Of Reason.
  • (IV.): That It Is The Doctrine Of Revelation.
  • (V.): Show The Ground Or Reason Of The Doctrine.
  • (VI.): When Men Are Reprobated.
  • (VII.): Reprobation Is Just.
  • (VIII.): Reprobation Is Benevolent.
  • (IX.): Reprobation Is The Best Thing That Can Be Done, All Things Considered.
  • (X.): How It May Be Known Who Are; Reprobates.
  • (XI.): Answer Objections.

[76] LECTURE LXXVI. Divine Sovereignty

  • (I.): What Is Not Intended By The Term Sovereignty, When Applied To God?
  • (II.): What Is Intended By It?
  • (III.): That God Is, And Ought To Be, An Absolute And Universal Sovereign.

[77] LECTURE LXXVII. Purposes of God

  • (I.): What I Understand By The Purposes Of God.
  • (II.): Notice the Distinction between Purpose and Decree.
  • (III.): Show That In Some Sense The Purposes Of God Must Extend To All Events.
  • (IV.): State Different Senses in Which God Purposes Different Events.
  • (V.): That God’s Revealed Will Is Never Inconsistent With His Secret Will Or Purpose.
  • (VI.): Notice The Wisdom And Benevolence Of The Divine Purposes.
  • (VII.): Show The Immutability Of The Divine Purposes.
  • (VIII.): That The Purposes Of God Are A Ground Of Eternal And Joyful Confidence.
  • (IX.): Consider The Relation Of The Purposes To The Prescience Or Foreknowledge Of God.
  • (X.): Show That God’s Purposes Are Not Inconsistent With, But Demand The Use Of Means, Both On The Part Of God And On Our Part To Accomplish Them.

[78] LECTURE LXXVIII. — Perseverance of Saints.

  • (I.): Call Attention to the Different Kinds of Certainty That May Be Predicated Of Different Things.
  • (II.): State What Is Not Intended By the Perseverance of the Saints, As I Hold the Doctrine.
  • (III.): Show What Is Intended By It.
  • (IV.): Present The Principal Arguments In Support Of It.
  • (V.): Notice The Objections To This Doctrine.

[79] LECTURE LXXIX. Perseverance of Saints. Perseverance of Saints proved

  • (IV.): The Principal Arguments In Support Of This Doctrine

[80] LECTURE LXXX. — Perseverance of Saints.

  • Perseverance Proved

[81] LECTURE LXXXI. — Perseverance of Saints.

  • Consider the objections to it.

[82] LECTURE LXXXII. — Perseverance of Saints.

  • Objections Answered

[83] LECTURE LXXXIII. — Perseverance of Saints.

  • Further objections answered

APPENDIX A: Reply to “Princeton Biblical Repertory”

APPENDIX B: Reply to Dr. Duffield

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *