Good News Translation GNT Translation Keys

This modern version of the Bible in mid-20th century American English, prepared by a group of American biblical scholars, is also known as the Good News Bible. Taking advantage of the many archaeological and manuscript discoveries as well as the insights of linguistic and biblical scholarship since the 16th century it was designed to meet the needs of a world-wide explosion of evangelism in a secular world where English had become the dominant international language and a familiarity with traditional theological terminology could not be assumed. Its style avoids the looseness of paraphrase as it translates the deep structures of the text in its original languages. This pioneering version has set the pattern for innumerable new translations and revisions of the Bible in other languages as well as in English. Over 40 million copies of the Good News Bible have been distributed world-wide since its first printing.


  


Asterisk  *: Other notes added at that time have been scrutinized and confirmation from Mr. Darby’s writings sought. Any notes which were judged to be of sufficient value to retain, but which could not be positively identified as being Mr. Darby’s (apart from those which are capable of easy verification by reference to a concordance) have been marked by an asterisk.


Italics Example: The transliteration of Hebrew and Greek letters in the notes has been retained as being more convenient to the English reader. Such words are printed in italics. The use of italics in the text indicates emphasis.


LXX: LXX in the footnotes refers to the Septuagint, the Greek version of the Old Testament.


Keri (קרי): Keri signifies the marginal note of the Massorites, indicating their idea of how the text should be read.


Chetiv: Chetiv is the Hebrew text as it is written. Cf. stands for ‘compare’; Lit. for ‘Literally’.


Square brackets [ ] in the text indicate

(a) words added to complete the sense in English similar to those shown in italics in the Authorised Version; or

(b), words as to which there are variations in the original manuscripts.

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