Greek mythological figures: Other deities


List of other Nonspecific Grouped Greek deities


1.0 AKRATOPOTÊS (Greek: Ἀκρατοπότης) (Latin: Acratopotes) (Translation: Drinking of Neat Wine [akratopoteô])  god of unmixed wine see: Akratos (Greek: Ακρατος) (Latin: Acratus) (Translation: Unmixed-Wine [akratos]). AKRATOS1)http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Akratos.html (Acratus) was the demi-god (daimon) of the drinking of unmixed wine. The Greeks traditionally drank their wine mixed with water so Akratos was no doubt regarded as a deity of festive excess. He was an attendant of the god Dionysos and a companion of Euphrosyne (Good Cheer).


2.0 ADRASTEIA (Greek: Αδράστεια) (Latin: Adrastea, Adrastia) (Translation: Not-Running-Away) a daughter of Ares and Aphrodite, or an epithet of Nemesis. IDA and ADRASTEIA2)http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NymphaiIdaiai.html were nymphs of Mount Ida in Krete (Crete) who were entrusted with the care of the infant god Zeus. They hid him away in the secluded Diktaion (Dictaean) cave, nursing him on honey and the milk of the she-goat Amaltheia. The Kouretes (Curetes), meanwhile, masked his cries with their shield-clashing war dance. As a reward for their service, Zeus placed the pair amongst the stars as the constellations Ursa Major and Minor (the Bears). The ancient Greeks also named these constellations Helike (the Circling One) and Kynosoura (the Dog’s Tail), the latter because it appears to form the tail of Canis Major. Amaltheia was sometimes described as a third nymph in this group, but in most accounts she was the milk-goat. The Idaian nymphs were perhaps the same as the Meliai (Honey-Nymphs) which according to Hesiod were born from the blood of the castrated Ouranos (Uranus).


3.0 AGDISTIS (Greek: Ἄγδιστις) (Latin: Agdistis) (Translation: Of Mount Agdistis (in Phrygia)) Phrygian hermaphroditic deity. AGDISTIS3)http://www.theoi.com/Phrygios/Agdistis.html was a hermaphroditic creature born of Gaia (Earth) when she was accidentally impregnated by the sleeping sky-god Zeus. The gods feared the strange double-gendered creature and castrated it, and it then became Kybele (Cybele), the great Phrygian goddess. This story related by Pausanias was a Greek translation of a tale from Phrygian myth. In the original, the parents of Agdistis-Kybele would have been the Phrygian Sky-God and Earth-Mother. Since Kybele was usually identified by the Greeks with Rhea, it is somewhat curious that the sky-god of the myth is here named Zeus rather than Ouranos.


4.0 ALEXIARÊS (Greek: Αλεξιαρης and Ανικητος) (Latin: Alexiares) (Translation: Warding-Off-War) 1 of twins, son of Heracles who presided over the defence of fortified towns and citadels. ANIKETOS4)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/AniketosAlexiares.html (Anicetus) and ALEXIARES were two Olympian demigods who presided over the defence and fortification of towns and citadels. Their names mean “the unconquerable one” from the Greek anikêtos and “he who wards off war” from alexis and arês. They were sons of Herakles (Heracles) and Hebe who were born after the hero’s ascension to Olympos. The pair were probably the gatekeepers of Olympos, a role which was also assigned to their immortal father. Aniketos and Alexiares were probably the same as the “Princes”–two boy-god sons of Herakles worshipped in Thebes. In Aiskhylos’ (Aeschylus’) play the Seven Against Thebes, Zeus is invoked as Alexeterios by the defending Thebans.

5.0 ANIKÊTOS (Greek: Ανικητος) (Latin: Anicetus) (Translation: Unconquerable) 1 of twins, son of Heracles who presided over the defence of fortified towns and citadels. ANIKETOS5)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/AniketosAlexiares.html (Anicetus) and ALEXIARES were two Olympian demigods who presided over the defence and fortification of towns and citadels. Their names mean “the unconquerable one” from the Greek anikêtos and “he who wards off war” from alexis and arês. They were sons of Herakles (Heracles) and Hebe who were born after the hero’s ascension to Olympos. The pair were probably the gatekeepers of Olympos, a role which was also assigned to their immortal father. Aniketos and Alexiares were probably the same as the “Princes”–two boy-god sons of Herakles worshipped in Thebes. In Aiskhylos’ (Aeschylus’) play the Seven Against Thebes, Zeus is invoked as Alexeterios by the defending Thebans.


6.0 APHRODITUS (Greek: Ἀφρόδιτος) (Latin: Aphroditos) Cyprian hermaphroditic Aphrodite. was a male Aphrodite originating from Amathus on the island of Cyprus and celebrated in Athens in a transvestite rite.


7.0 ASTRAIA (Greek: Αστραία) (Latin: Astraea) (Translation: Starry One (astêr)) virgin goddess of justice. ASTRAIA6)http://www.theoi.com/Titan/Astraia.html (Astraea) was the virgin-goddess of justice. During the Golden Age she dwelt upon the earth with mankind but was driven away by the increasing lawlessness of the subsequent Bronze Age. Zeus then set her amongst the stars as the constellation Virgo. Astraia was closely identified with the goddesses Dike (Justice) and Nemesis (Rightful Indignation).


8.0 AUXÊSIA, AUXÔ (Greek: Αυξησια Αυξω) (Latin: Auxesia, Auxo) (Translation: Growth, Increase [auxêsis]) 1 of two local fertility goddesses. see also Damia. AUXESIA7)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/HoraAuxesia.html was the goddess Hora (Season) or Kharis (Grace) of spring growth. The Athenians worshipped her alongside the Horai Hegemone (Queen) and Karpo (Carpo, Fruit). The Argives, on the other hand, paired her with the goddess Damia (Of the Land), describing the two as Kretan maidens–probably priestesses–who were elevated to divinity following their martyrdom at the hands of local peasants.

9.0 DAMIA (Greek: Δαμία) (Latin: Damia) (Translation: Earth-Mother (da, maia)) 1 of two local fertility goddesses. see also Auxêsia, Auxô. DAMIA8)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/HoraDamia.html was the goddess Hora (Season) of the fertile earth. The Argives worshipped her together with the goddess Auxesia (Spring Growth) and described them as a pair of Kretan (Cretan) maidens who received divine status after they were wrongfully stoned to death by peasants. She was probably the same as the goddess Karpo (Carpo) (Fruiting) who was worshipped beside Auxo by the Athenians. Damia was also a title of Demeter as the goddess of the fertile earth and Auxesia was a title of her daughter Persephone as the goddess of spring growth. Her name is derived from the Greek words da, dê, , “earth”, and maia “nursing mother”.


10.0 Charites (Greek: Χάριτες) (Latin: Charis) (Translation: Gratiae, the “Graces”) goddesses of charm, beauty, nature, human creativity, and fertility


10.1 AGLAEA (Greek: Αγλαΐα) (Latin: Aglaea) (Translation: beauty, adornment) goddess of beauty, adornment, splendor and glory. ΑΓΛΑΙΑ9)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/A/Aglaia.html One of the three Graces and the wife of Hephaestus. [See CHARITES.] The wife of Charopus and mother of Nireus, who led a small band from the island of Syme against Troy. (Hom. Il. ii. 671; Diod. v. 53.) Another Aglaia is mentioned in Apollodorus. (ii. 7. § 8.) AGLAIA10)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html(Aglaea) was the Kharis (Charis) goddess of beauty, adornment, splendour and glory. She was one of three Kharites (Charites), her sisters being Euphrosyne and Thalia. Aglaia was also the wife of the god Hephaistos (Hephaestus).


10.2 EUPHROSYNÊ (Greek: Εὐφροσύνη) (Latin: Euphrosyne) (Translation: Good Cheer, Mirth) goddess of good cheer, joy, mirth, and merriment. EUPHROSYNE11)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/KharisEuphrosyne.html was one of the three Kharites (Charites) and the goddess of good cheer, mirth, merriment and joy. Her name is the feminine form of the Greek word euphrosynos meaning “merriment”. In the mosaic right she is paired with Akratos (Acratus), the celebratory spirit of unmixed wine. She was usually depicted dancing in a circle with her two sisters. EUPHROSYNE12)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html She was one of three sister Kharites, the other two being Aglaia and Thalia.


10.3 THALEIA (Greek: Θάλεια) (Latin: Thalia) (Translation: Festivity, Blooming) goddess of festive celebrations and rich and luxurious banquets. THALEIA13)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaThaleia.html (Thalia) was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific artistic and literary spheres, Thaleia was named Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. In this guise she was portrayed with the attributes of comic mask, shepherd’s staff and wreath of ivy. Her name was derived from the Greek word thaleia, meaning “rich festivity” or “blooming.” THALIA14)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html The Kharis goddess of festive celebrations and rich and luxurious banquets. She was one of three Kharites, the other two being Aglaia and Euphrosyne.


10.4 HEGEMONE (Greek: Ηγεμόνη) “mastery” ΗΓΕΜΟΝΗ15)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/H/Hegemone.html That is, the leader or ruler, is the name of one of the Athenian Charites. When the Athenian ephebi took their civic oath, they invoked Hegemone. (Pollux, viii. 106; Paus. ix. 35. § 1.) Hegemone occurs also as a surname of Artemis at Sparta, and in Arcadia. (Paus. iii. 14. § 6, viii. 36. § 7, 47. § 4; Callim. Hymn. in Dian. 227; Polyaen. viii. 52.) HEGEMONE16)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html A Kharis worshipped at Athens along with Auxo and Damia.


10.5 ANTHEIA (Greek: Άνθεια) (Latin: Antheia) (Translation: derived from ανθος (anthos) meaning “flower, blossom”.)17)http://www.behindthename.com/name/anthea goddess of flowers and flowery wreaths. ΑΝΘΕΙΑ18)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/A/Antheia.html The blooming, or the friend of flowers, a surname of Hera, under which she had a temple at Argos. Before this temple was the mound under which the women were buried who had come with Dionysus from the Aegean islands, and had fallen in a contest with the Argives and Perseus. (Paus. ii. 22. § 1.) Antheia was used at Gnossus as a surname of Aphrodite. (Hesych. s. v.) The nymph of flowers who occurs as an attendant of Aphrodite in Athenian vase painting. ANTHEIA19)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html (Anthea) was the goddess of flowers and flowery wreaths worn at festivals and parties. She was one of the attendants of Aphrodite in Athenian vase painting.


10.6 PASITHEÊ (Greek: Πασιθέα) (Latin: Pasithea Passitea, Passidea) (Translation: Acquired Goddess/goddess of all) goddess of rest and relaxation, PASITHEA20)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/KharisPasithea.html was one of the younger Kharites (Charites) and the wife of Hypnos, god of sleep. She was probably the goddess of rest and relaxation. Pasitheê21)http://www.behindthename.com/name/pasithea/submitted Means “goddess of all”, derived from Greek πᾶς (pas) meaning “all, for all, of all” combined with Greek θεα (thea) meaning “goddess”. In Greek mythology she was one of the Charites, married to Hypnos, the god of sleep and dreams; she may have been regarded as a goddess of rest and relaxation or of hallucinations and hallucinogenic drugs.


10.7 KLETA (Greek: Κλήτα) (Latin: Cleta) (Translation: fame and glory) “the glorious” KLETA ΚΛΗΤΑ22)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html The Kharis goddess of fame and glory. She was one of two Kharites worshipped by the Spartans, the other being Phaenna.


10.8 PHAENNA (Greek: Φαέννα) (Latin: phaeinos) (Translation: shining) “the shining” PHAENNA23)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html One of two Kharites worshipped by the Spartans. The other was Kleta. PHAEINOS24)http://www.behindthename.com/name/phaenna Derived from Greek φαεινος (phaeinos) “shining”. According to some Greek myths this was the name of one of the three Graces or Χαριτες (Charites).


10.9 EU̯DAI̯MONÍA (Greek: Ευδαιμονία) (Latin: Eudaimonia Eudaemonia) (Translation: happiness or welfare) “happiness” EUDAIMONIA25)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html (Eudaemonia) The goddess of happiness, prosperity and opulence. She was one of a bevy of beautiful young goddesses that formed the retinue of Aphrodite (as depicted in ancient greek vase painting).


10.10 EUTHYMIA (Greek: Ευθυμία) (Translation: Good Cheer, Joy) “good mood” EUTHYMIA26)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.htmlThe Kharis goddess of good cheer, joy and contentment. She was usually named Euphrosyne.


10.11 KALLEIS (Greek: Καλλείς) (Latin: Calleis) (Translation: Beauty (kallos)) “beauty” KALLEIS27)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html (Calleis) The Kharis goddess of beauty. She was usually called Aglaia.


10.12 PAIDIA (Greek: Παιδία) (Latin: Paedia / Paedeia) (Translation: literally “play and amusement”) “play, amusement” PAIDIA28)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html (Paedia) The goddess of play and amusement. Paidia, like most of Aphrodite’s attendants, is not mentioned in any surviving classical literature. She is, however, frequently depicted beside the goddess in ancient vase painting.


10.13 PANDAISIA (Greek: Πανδαισία) (Latin: Pandaisia) (Translation: literally “Banquet”) “banquet for everyone” PANDAISIA29)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html The goddess of rich banquets. She appears in Athenian vase painting as an attendant of the goddess Aphrodite.


10.14 PANNYCHIS (Greek: Παννυχίς) (Latin: Pannychis) (Translation: all night) “all-night (festivity)” PANNYKHIS30)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html (Pannychis) The goddess of night festivities and parties. She was one of the attendants of Aphrodite, as depicted in Athenian vase painting.


11.0 KERAÔN (Greek: Κεραων) (Latin:Ceraon / Keraon) (Translation: Mixing [keraô]) demi-god of the meal, specifically the mixing of wine ΚΕΡΑΩΝ31)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/C/Ceraon.html “The mixer,” a hero whose statue was set up by cooks in the Spartan mess.


12.0 KHRYSOS CHRYSUS (Greek: Χρύσος) (Latin: Chrysus) (Translation: Gold) spirit of gold. “Khrysos32)Pindar, Fragment 222 (trans. Sandys) (Greek lyric 5th century BC) (Gold) is a child of Zeus; neither moth nor rust devoureth it; but the mind of man is devoured by this supreme possession.” ΧΡΥΣΟΣ33)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/C/Chrysus.html The personification of gold, a son of Zeus.


13.0 KIRKÊ CIRCE (Greek: Κίρκη) (Latin: Circe) (Translation: Hoop Round [kirkoô]) goddess-witch of Aeaea. KIRKE34)http://www.theoi.com/Titan/Kirke.html (Circe) was a goddess of sorcery (pharmakeia) who was skilled in the magic of transmutation, illusion, and necromancy. She lived on the mythical island of Aiaia (Aeaea) with her nymph companions. When Odysseus came to her island she transformed his men into beasts but, with the help of the god Hermes, he overcame her and forced her to end the spell. Kirke’s name is derived from the Greek verbkirkoô meaning “to secure with rings” or “hoop around”–a reference to the binding power of magic. Kirke’s island of Aiaia (Aeaea) was located in the far west, near the earth-encircling River Okeanos(Oceanus). Her brother Aeetes’ realm in the far east was similarly named Aia (Aea).


14.0 Daimones Keramikoi (the) (Greek: Δαίμονες Κεραμικοί) (Latin: Daemones Ceramici) (Translation: Pottery Demons) THE DAIMONES KERAMIKOI (Daemones Ceramici) were five malevolent spirits which plagued the craftsman potter–Suntribos (the Shatterer), Smaragos (the Smasher), Asbetos (Charrer), Sabaktes (Destroyer) and Omodamos (Crudebake). ΔΑΙΜΟΝΕΣ35)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/D/Daemones.html Protecting spirits, Latin Genii, analogous to the guardian angels invoked by the Church of Rome. The belief in such spirits existed both in Greece and at Rome. The Greeks called them daimones, daemons, and appear to have believed in them from the earliest times, though Homer does not mention them. Hesiod (Op. et Dies, 235) speaks of daimones, and says that they were 30,000 in number, and that they dwelled on earth unseen by mortals, as the ministers of Zeus, and as the guardians of men and of justice. He further conceives them to be the souls of the righteous men who lived in the golden age of the world. (Op. et Dies, 107; comp. Diog. Laert. vii. 79.) The Greek philosophers took up this idea, and developed a complete theory of daemons. Thus we read in Plato (Phaedr. p. 107), that daemons are assigned to men at the moment of their birth, that thenceforward they accompany men through life, and that after death they conduct their souls to Hades. Pindar, in several passages, speaks of a genethlios daimôn, that is, the spirit watching over the fate of man from the hour of his birth, which appears to be the same as the dii genitales of the Romans. (Ol. viii. 16, xiii. 101, Pyth. iv. 167; comp. Aeschyl. Sept. 639.) The daemons are further described as the ministers and companions of the gods, who carry the prayers of men to the gods, and the gifts of the gods to men (Plat. Sympos. p. 202 ; Appul. de Deo Socrat. 7), and accordingly float in immense numbers in the space between heaven and earth. The daemons, however, who were exclusively the ministers of the gods, seem to have constituted a distinct class; thus, the Corybantes, Dactyls, and Cabeiri are called the ministering daemons of the great gods (Strab. x. p. 472); Gigon, Tychon, and Orthages are the daemons of Aphrodite (Hesych. s. v. Gignôn; Tzetz. ad Lycophr. 538); Hadreus, the daemon of Demeter (Etym. Magn. s. v. Adreus), and Acratus, the daemon of Dionysus. (Paus. i. 2. § 4.) It should, however, be observed that all daemons were divided into two great classes, viz. good and evil daemons. The works which contain most information on this interesting subject are Appuleius, De Deo Socratis, and Plutarch, De Genio Socratis, and De Defectu Oraculorum. Later writers apply the term daimones also to the souls of the departed. (Lucian, De Mort. Pereg. 36; Dorville, ad Chariton. i. 4.)


14.1 SYNTRIBOS / SYNTRIBÔ (Greek: Σύντριβος) (Latin: Suntribus / ) (Translation: Shatter, Crush [syntribô]) (Σύντριβος; aka Suntribus) — the shatterer (shatter, crush; syntribô)


14.2 SMARAGOS / SMARAGEÔ (Greek: Σμάραγος) (Latin: Smaragus) (Translation: Smash, Crash [smarageô]) the smasher


14.3 ASBETOS (Greek: Ασβετος) (Latin: Asbetus) (Translation: Char, Scorch [asbetos]) the charrer


14.4 SABAKTES / SABAKTÊS (Greek: Σαβάκτης) (Latin: Sabactes) (Translation: Shatter, Destroy [sabaktês]) the destroyer


14.5 ÔMODAMOS / OMODAMOS   (Greek: Ωμόδαμος) (Latin: Omodamus) (Translation: Crudebake [ômos]) crudebake


15.0 DEIPNEUS (Greek: Δειπνεύς) (Latin: Deipneus) (Translation: Meal-Making (deipneô)) demi-god of the preparation of meals, specifically the making of bread. Deipneus,36)Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae 1. 39c – 39d [trans. Gullick] [Greek rhetorician 2nd to 3rd century AD] who got his name from deipna (Dinners), is held in honour.” 


16.0 EIRÆSIÓHNI EIRESIONE (Greek: Ειρεσιώνη) (Latin: Eiresione) (Translation: branch of olive or laurel wound round with wool and hung with fruits)37)http://www.hellenicgods.org/eiraesiohni—eiresione—eiresione personification of the olive branch


17.0 ELÊLUTHYIA EILEITHYIA / ILITHYIA (Greek: Εἰλείθυια) (Latin: Lucina, Nation) (Translation: Relieve [elêluthyia]) goddess of childbirth, EILEITHYIA38)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Eileithyia.html (Ilithyia) was the goddess of childbirth and labour pains. According to some there were two Eileithyiai (Eileithyiae)–one who furthered birth and one who protracted the labour. Her name means “she who comes to aid” or “relieve” from the Greek word elêluthyia. Her Roman counterpart was Lucina (“Light bringer”) or Natio (“Birth”). When Alkmene (Alcmena) was in labour with Herakles (Heracles), Hera sent Eileithyia to stay the birth and so kill mother and child. However, Alkmene’s handmaiden Galinthias spied the goddess seated before the door with her arms and legs crossed, and cried “a son is born.” The goddess leapt up in surprise, releasing her magical grip on the womb, allowing the child to be born. Eileithyia was furious at being tricked by the woman and transformed Galinthias into a polecat. Eileithyia was depicted as a woman wielding a torch, representing the burning pains of childbirth, or with her arms raised in the air to bring the child to the light. She was closely identified with the goddesses Hera and Artemis, both of whom bore epithets of her name.


18.0 ENYALIOS ENYALIUS (Greek: Ενυάλιος) (Latin: Enyalius) (Translation: Warlike) minor god of war. ENYALIOS39)http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Enyalios.html (Enyalius) was a minor god or spirit of war and an attendant of Ares. The name Enyalius, though, was usually just a title of Ares.


19.0 ENYÔ ENYO (Greek: Ἐνυώ) (Latin: Bellona, Bella) (Translation: Warlike (enyo)) goddess of destructive war. ENYO40)http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Enyo.html was the goddess or personified spirit (daimona) of war. She was the female counterpart and close companion of the god Ares Enyalios. Enyo was closely identified with Eris, the goddess of strife. Indeed Homer does not appear to distinguish between the two goddesses. She was also connected with the Anatolian goddess Ma and the Roman Bellona.


20.0 HARPOKRATES / HARPOCRATES (Greek: Ἁρποκράτης) (Latin: Harpocrates) (Translation: Harpa-khruti) god of silence. HARPOKRATES41)http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Harpokrates.html (Harpocrates) was the god of silence. Harpokrates was the Greek interpretation of the Egyptian god Harpa-Khruti (Horus the Child) who was usually depicted as a small boy with a finger held to his lips–an Egyptian gesture symbolising childhood which the Greeks mistook for a hush for silence.


21.0 HERMAPHRODITOS HERMAPHRODITUS (Greek: Ἑρμάφρόδιτός) (Latin: Hermaphroditus) (Translation: Hermaphrodite, Effeminate) god of hermaphrodites and effeminate men. HERMAPHRODITOS (Hermaphroditus) was the god of hermaphrodites and of effeminates. He was numbered amongst the winged love-gods known as Erotes. Hermaphroditos was a son of Hermes and Aphrodite, the gods of male and female sexuality. According to some he was once a handsome youth who attracted the love of a Naiad nymphe Salmakis (Salmacis). She prayed to to be united with him forever and the gods, answering her prayer, merged their two forms into one. At the same time her spring acquired the property of making men who bathed in its waters soft and effeminate. Hermaphroditos was depicted as a winged youth with both male and female features–usually female thighs, breasts, and style of hair, and male genitalia.

ΕΡΜΑΦΡΟΔΙΤΟΣ42)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/H/Hermaphroditus.html The name is compounded of Hermes and Aphrodite, and is synonymous with androgunês, gunandros, hêmiandros, &c. He was originally a male Aphrodite (Aphroditus), and represented as a Hermes with the phallus, the symbol of fertility (Paus. i. 19. § 2), but afterwards as a divine being combining the two sexes, and usually with the head, breasts, and body of a female, but with the sexual parts of a man. According to a tradition in Ovid (Met. iv. 285, &c.), he was a son of Hermes and Aphrodite, and consequently a great-grandson of Atlas, whence he is called Atlantiades or Atlantius. (Ov. Met. iv. 368; Hygin. Fab. 271.) He had inherited the beauty of both his parents, and was brought up by the nymphs of Mount Ida. In his fifteenth year he went to Caria; in the neighbourhood of Halicarnassus he laid down by the well Salmacis. The nymph of the well fell in love with him, and tried to win his affections, but in vain Once when he was bathing in the well, she embraced him, and prayed to the gods that they might permit her to remain united with him for ever. The gods granted the request, and the bodies of the youth and the nymph became united in such a manner that the two together could not be called either a man or a woman, but were both. Hermaphroditus, on becoming aware of the change, prayed that in future every one who bathed in the well should be metamorphosed into an hermaphrodite. (Ov. l.c.; Diod. iv. 6; Lucian,Dial. Deor. 15. 2; Vitruv. ii. 8; Fest. s. v. Salmacis.) In this, as in other mythological stories, we must not suppose that the idea is based on a fact, but the idea gave rise to the tale, and thus received, as it were, a concrete body. The idea itself was probably derived from the worship of nature in the East, where we find not only monstrous compounds of animals, but also that peculiar kind of dualism which manifests itself in the combination of the male and female. Others, however, conceive that the hermaphrodites were subjects of artistic representation rather than of religious worship. The ancient artists frequently represented hermaphrodites, either in groups or separately, and either in a reclining or a standing attitude. The first celebrated statue of an hermaphrodite was that by Polycles. (Plin. H. N. xxiv. 19, 20.)


22.0 HYMENAIOS, HYMÊN HYMENAIOS (Greek: Ὑμέναιος) (Latin: Hymenaeus) (Translation: Bridal-Hymn (hymenaios)) god of marriage and marriage feasts. HYMENAIOS43)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/ErosHymenaios.html (Hymenaeus) was the god of weddings or, more specifically, of the wedding hymn sung by the bride’s train as she was escorted to the house of the groom. Hymenaios was numbered amongst the Erotes, the youthful, winged gods of love. As a god of song he was usually described as a son of Apollon and one of the Mousai (Muses). Hymenaios is depicted in Greek art as a winged child carrying a bridal torch in his hand.


23.0 IKHNAIÊ ICHNAEA (Greek: Ιχναία) (Latin: Ichnaea) (Translation: Tracing, Tracking) goddess of tracking. IKHNAIE44)http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NympheIynx.html (Ichnaea) was the goddess of tracing and tracking. She was one of the female Titanes who possessed an oracle at Ikhnai (Ichnae) in Thessalia (Thessaly). Her name was derived from the Greek verb ichneuô meaning “to trace” or “to track”.


24.0 IYNX (Greek: Ιύνξ) (Latin: Jinx) (Translation: Jinx, Wryneck-Bird) goddess of the love charm. IYNX (Iunx), a daughter of Peitho and Pan, or of Echo. She endeavoured to charm Zeus, or make him, by magic means, fall in love with Io; in consequence of which Hera metamorphosed her into the bird called lynx (iynx torquilla). (Schol. ad Theocrit. ii. 17, ad Pind. Pyth. iv. 380, Nem. iv. 56; Tzetz. ad Lycoph. 310.) According to another story, she was a daughter of Pierus, and as she and her sisters had presumed to enter into a musical contest with the Muses, she was changed into the bird lynx. (Anton. lib. 9.) This bird, the symbol of passionate and restless love, was given by Aphrodite to Jason, who, by turning it round and pronouncing certain magic words, excited the love of Medeia. (Pind. Pyth. iv. 380, &c.; Tzetz. l. c.)


25.0 MATTÔN MATTON (Greek: Μάττων) (Latin: Matton) (Translation: Kneading (mattô)) demi-god of the meal, specifically the kneading of dough. MATTON45)http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Matton.html and KERAON (Ceraon) were Spartan demi-gods of the preparation of meals. Matton was the breadmaker, literally “kneader of dough”, and Keraon the mixer of wine.


26.0 Mousa, Mousai Muses (the) (Greek: Μούσαι) (Latin: Musa, Musae) (Translation: Muse, Muses, Of Song) goddesses of music, song and dance, and the source of inspiration to poets. THE MOUSAI46)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Mousai.html (Muses) were the goddesses of music, song and dance, and the source of inspiration to poets. They were also goddesses of knowledge, who remembered all things that had come to pass. Later the Mousai were assigned specific artistic spheres: Kalliope (Calliope), epic poetry; Kleio (Clio), history; Ourania (Urania), astronomy; Thaleia (Thalia), comedy; Melpomene, tragedy; Polymnia (Polyhymnia), religious hymns; Erato, erotic poetry; Euterpe, lyric poetry; and Terpsikhore (Terpsichore), choral song and dance. In ancient Greek vase painting the Mousai were depicted as beautiful young women with a variety of musical intruments. In later art each of the nine was assigned her own distinctive attribute. There were two alternative sets of Mousai–the three or four Mousai Titanides and the three Mousai Apollonides.


26.1 Mousai Titanides Titan Muses, daughters of Uranus and Gaia

 


26.1.1 AOIDÊ AOIDE (Greek: Ἀοιδή) (Latin: Aoede) (Translation: Song [aoidê]) muse of song


26.1.2 ARKHÊ ARCHE (Greek: Αρχή) (Latin: Arche) (Translation: Beginning [arkhê]) muse of origins


26.1.3 MELETÊ MELETE (Greek: Μελέτη) (Latin: Melete) (Translation: Practice [meletê]) muse of meditation and practice


26.1.4 MNÊMOSYNÊ MNEME (Greek: Μνήμη) (Latin: Mnema) (Translation: Memory) muse of memory. MNEMOSYNE47)http://www.theoi.com/Titan/TitanisMnemosyne.html was Titan goddess of memory and remembrance and the inventress of language and words. As a Titan daughter of Ouranos (Uranus, Heaven), Mnemosyne was also a goddess of time. She represented the rote memorisation required to preserve the stories of history and the sagas of myth before the introduction of writing. In this role she was the mother of the Mousai (Muses) who were originally patron goddesses of poets of the oral tradition. Finally Mnemosyne was a minor oracular goddess like her sister-Titanesses. She presided over the underground oracle of Trophonios (Trophonius) in Boiotia (Boeotia). The Titanis (Titaness) Mnemosyne was sometimes named as one of three Elder Mousai (Muses), who preceded the nine daughters of Zeus as goddesses of music.


26.1.5 THELXINOÊ THELXINOE (Greek: Θελξινόη) (Latin: Thelxinoe) (Translation: Charming the Mind [thelxis, noos]) muse “charmer of minds”

 


26.2 Mousai Apollonides Olympian Muses, daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne

 


26.2.1 KALLIOPÊ / CALLIOPE  (Greek: Καλλιόπη) (Latin: Calliope) (Translation: Beautiful-Voice (kalli-, ops)) muse of epic poetry


26.2.2 KLEIÔ / CLIO (Greek: Κλειώ) (Latin: Clio) (Translation: Make-Famous, Celebrate [kleô]) muse of history. KLEIO48)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaKleio.html (Clio) was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific literary and artistic spheres, Kleio was named Muse of history. In this guise she was represented holding an open scroll or seated beside a chest of books. Her name was derived from the Greek verb kleô, “to make famous” or “celebrate.”


26.2.3 EUTERPÊ EUTERPE (Greek: Ευτέρπη) (Latin: Euterpe) (Translation: Well Pleasing) muse of musical poetry. EUTERPE was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific literary and artistic spheres, Euterpe was named Muse of lyric poetry. Her attribute was the double-flute. Euterpe’s name was derived from the Greek words eu– and terpô, meaning “giver of much delight.”


26.2.4 ERATÔ ERATO (Greek: Ερατώ) (Latin: Erato) (Translation:Lovely, Beloved (eratos)) muse of lyric poetry. ERATO49)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaErato.html was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific literary and artistic spheres, Erato was named Muse of erotic poetry and mime, and represented with a lyre. Her name means “lovely” or “beloved” from the Greek word eratos


26.2.5 MELPOMENÊ MELPOMENE (Greek: Μελπομένη) (Latin: Melpomene) (Translation: Celebrate with Song [melpô]) muse of tragedy. MELPOMENE50)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaMelpomene.html was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific artistic and literary spheres, Melpomene was named Muse of tragedy. In this guise she was portrayed holding a tragic mask or sword, and sometimes wearing a wreath of ivy and cothurnus boots. Her name was derived from the Greek verb melpô or melpomai meaning “to celebrate with dance and song.”


26.2.6 POLYMNIA POLYHYMNIA 51)[Plutarch Symposium 9.14](Greek: Πολυμνία) or (Πολύμνια) (Latin: Polyhymnia) (Translation: Many Hymns (poly-, hymnos)) muse of sacred poetry. POLYMNIA52)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaPolyhymnia.html (Polyhymnia) was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific artistic and literary spheres, Polyhymnia was named Muse of religious hymns and portrayed as a woman in a pensive or meditative pose. Her name was derived from the Greek words poly- “many” and hymnos “praise” or “hymn.” 


26.2.7 TERPSIKHORÊ TERPSICHORE (Greek: Τερψιχόρη) (Latin: Tersichore) (Translation: Delighting in Dance (terpsis, khoros)) muse of dance and choral poetry. TERPSIKHORE53)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaTerpsikhore.html (Terpsichore) was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific literary and artistic spheres, Terpsikhore was named Muse of choral song and dancing, and depicted with a lyre and plectrum.


26.2.8 THALEIA THALIA (Greek: Θάλεια) (Latin: Thalia) (Translation: Rich Festivity, Blooming (thaleia)) muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. THALEIA54)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaThaleia.html (Thalia) was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific artistic and literary spheres, Thaleia was named Muse of comedy and bucolic poetry. In this guise she was portrayed with the attributes of comic mask, shepherd’s staff and wreath of ivy. Her name was derived from the Greek word thaleia, meaning “rich festivity” or “blooming.”


26.2.9 OURANIÊ URANIA / OURANIA (Greek: Ουρανία) (Latin: Urania) (Translation: Heavenly One [ouranos]) muse of astronomy. OURANIA55)http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaOurania.html (Urania) was one of the nine Mousai (Muses), the goddesses of music, song and dance. In the Classical era, when the Mousai were assigned specific artistic and literary spheres, Ourania was named Muse of astronomy and astronomical writings. In this guise she was depicted pointing at a celestial globe with a rod.

 


26.3 Younger Muses, daughters of Apollo

 


26.3.1 KÊPHISÔ CEPHISSO (Greek: Κεφισσώ) (Latin: Cephiso) (Translation: Of the Cephisus)


26.3.2 APOLLÔNIS APOLLONIS (Greek: Απολλωνίς) (Latin: Apollonis) (Translation: Daughter of Apollon)


26.3.3 BORYSTHENIS (Greek: Βορυσθενίς) (Latin: Borysthenis) (Translation: ?-Strength (sthenos))


26.3.4 HYPATÊ HYPATE (Greek: Υπάτη) (Latin: Hypate) (Translation: Highest Note of Lyre) “the upper (chord of the lyre)”


26.3.5 MÊSÊ MESE (Greek: Μέση) (Latin: Mese) (Translation: Middle Note of Lyre) “the middle (chord of the lyre)”


26.3.6 NÊTÊ NETE (Greek: Νήτη) (Latin: Nete) (Translation: Lowest Note of Lyre) “the lower (chord of the lyre)”


26.4 POLYMATHEIA (Greek: Πολυμάθεια) (Translation: “much knowledge, erudition”) muse of knowledge. ΠΟΛΥΜΑΘΕΙΑ56)http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/P/Polymatheia.html Polymatheia57)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymatheia (Greek: Πολυμάθεια) in Greek mythology was one of the three Muses recognized at Sicyon, as remarked by Plutarch. Her name literally means “much knowledge, erudition”, and Plutarch compares her to Polymnia to whom he ascribes precedence over accumulation and preservation of knowledge.


27.0 PALAISTRA Greek: Παλαίστρα) (Latin: Palaestra) (Translation: Wrestling (palaistra)) goddess of wrestling. Palaestra was the goddess or spirit (daimona) of the sport of wrestling. She was a daughter of the athlete-god Hermes. PALAESTRA,58)https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palaestra_(mythology)#Palaestra.2C_daughter_of_Hermes a daughter of Hermes, was believed to have grown up in Arcadia, which connected her with Olympia and the Olympian Games. She was credited with inventing the art of wrestling for men to entertain themselves during the times of peace. Palaestra herself was seen as a skilled wrestler with androgynous looks and boyish ways, as is evident from the extended physical description of her by Philostratus:


28.0 RHAPSO (Greek: Ραψώ) minor goddess or nymph whose name apparently refers to sewing. In Greek mythology, Rhapso (Greek: Ῥαψώ) was a nymph or a minor goddess worshipped at Athens. She is known solely from an inscription of the 4th century BCE, found at Phaleron. Her name apparently derives from the Greek verb ῥάπτω “to sew” or “to stitch”. According to some, she is associated with the Moirai (as a fate goddess) and Eileithyia (as a birth goddess); she somehow organized a man’s thread of life, at birth, by some sort of stitching work (similar to Clotho of the Moirai). And according to others, she was possibly a patroness of seamstresses.


Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Greek_mythological_figures

References   [ + ]

1. http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Akratos.html
2. http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NymphaiIdaiai.html
3. http://www.theoi.com/Phrygios/Agdistis.html
4, 5. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/AniketosAlexiares.html
6. http://www.theoi.com/Titan/Astraia.html
7. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/HoraAuxesia.html
8. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/HoraDamia.html
9. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/A/Aglaia.html
10, 12, 14, 16, 19, 22, 23, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Kharites.html
11. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/KharisEuphrosyne.html
13, 54. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaThaleia.html
15. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/H/Hegemone.html
17. http://www.behindthename.com/name/anthea
18. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/A/Antheia.html
20. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/KharisPasithea.html
21. http://www.behindthename.com/name/pasithea/submitted
24. http://www.behindthename.com/name/phaenna
31. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/C/Ceraon.html
32. Pindar, Fragment 222 (trans. Sandys) (Greek lyric 5th century BC
33. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/C/Chrysus.html
34. http://www.theoi.com/Titan/Kirke.html
35. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/D/Daemones.html
36. Athenaeus, Deipnosophistae 1. 39c – 39d [trans. Gullick] [Greek rhetorician 2nd to 3rd century AD]
37. http://www.hellenicgods.org/eiraesiohni—eiresione—eiresione
38. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Eileithyia.html
39. http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Enyalios.html
40. http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Enyo.html
41. http://www.theoi.com/Daimon/Harpokrates.html
42. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/H/Hermaphroditus.html
43. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/ErosHymenaios.html
44. http://www.theoi.com/Nymphe/NympheIynx.html
45. http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/Matton.html
46. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/Mousai.html
47. http://www.theoi.com/Titan/TitanisMnemosyne.html
48. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaKleio.html
49. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaErato.html
50. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaMelpomene.html
51. [Plutarch Symposium 9.14]
52. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaPolyhymnia.html
53. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaTerpsikhore.html
55. http://www.theoi.com/Ouranios/MousaOurania.html
56. http://www.mythindex.com/greek-mythology/P/Polymatheia.html
57. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polymatheia
58. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Palaestra_(mythology)#Palaestra.2C_daughter_of_Hermes

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *