Cupid and Psyche

Greek Underworld Visitors

Cupid and Psyche orEros and Psyche

Cupid and Psyche is a story originally from Metamorphoses (also called The Golden Ass), written in the 2nd century AD by Lucius Apuleius Madaurensis (or Platonicus).

It concerns the overcoming of obstacles to the love between Psyche (/ˈsk/, Greek: Ψυχή, “Soul” or “Breath of Life”) and Cupid (LatinCupido, “Desire”) or Amor (“Love”, Greek Eros ’′Ερως), and their ultimate union in a sacred marriage.

Although the only extended narrative from antiquity is that of Apuleius, Eros and Psyche appear in Greek art as early as the 4th century BC. The story’s Neoplatonic elements and allusions to mystery religions accommodate multiple interpretations, and it has been analyzed as an allegory and in light of folktale, Märchen or fairy tale, and myth.

Since the rediscovery of Apuleius’s novel in the Renaissance, the reception of Cupid and Psyche in the classical tradition has been extensive. The story has been retold in poetry, drama, and opera, and depicted widely in painting, sculpture, and even wallpaper. Psyche’s Roman name through direct translation is Anima.

More Details: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cupid_and_Psyche

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