Moabites (Nation)

*LOT: (/lɒt/; Hebrew: לוֹט, Modern Lot, Tiberian Lôṭ ; “veil” or “covering”[1]) was a patriarch in the biblical Book of Genesis chapters 11–14 and 19. Notable episodes in his life include his travels with his uncle Abram (Abraham), his flight from the destruction of Sodom and Gomorrah, during which Lot’s wife became a pillar of salt, and the seduction by his daughters so that they could bear children.


Lot and his daughters

The account of Lot and his daughters is in Genesis 19:30-38

Genesis 19:30 And Lot went up out of Zoar, and dwelt in the mountain, and his two daughters with him; for he feared to dwell in Zoar: and he dwelt in a cave, he and his two daughters.
31 And the firstborn said unto the younger, Our father is old, and there is not a man in the earth to come in unto us after the manner of all the earth:
32 Come, let us make our father drink wine, and we will lie with him, that we may preserve seed of our father.
33 And they made their father drink wine that night: and the firstborn went in, and lay with her father; and he perceived not when she lay down, nor when she arose.
34 And it came to pass on the morrow, that the firstborn said unto the younger, Behold, I lay yesternight with my father: let us make him drink wine this night also; and go thou in, and lie with him, that we may preserve seed of our father.
35 And they made their father drink wine that night also: and the younger arose, and lay with him; and he perceived not when she lay down, nor when she arose.
36 Thus were both the daughters of Lot with child by their father.

The older daughter conceived Moab (Hebrew מוֹאָב, lit., “from the father” [meh-Av]), father of the Moabites;[v.37] the younger conceived Ben-Ammi (Hebrew בֶּן-עַמִּי, lit., “Son of my people”), father of the Ammonites.[v.38]

The story, usually called Lot and his daughters, has been the subject of many paintings over the centuries, and became one of the subjects in the Power of Women group of subjects, warning men against the dangers of succumbing to the temptations of women, while also providing an opportunity for an erotic depiction. The scene generally shows Lot and his daughters eating and drinking in their mountain refuge. Often the background contains a small figure of Lot’s wife, and in the distance, a burning city.[6]

Scholarly appraisal

The presumptive incest between Lot and his daughters has raised many questions, debates, and theories as to what the real motives were, who really was at fault, and the level of bias the author of Genesis Chapter 19 had. However, such biblical scholars as Jacob Milgrom,[8] Victor P. Hamilton,[9] and Calum Carmichael[10] postulate that the Levitical laws could not have been developed the way they were, without controversial issues surrounding the patriarchs of Israel, especially regarding incest. Carmichael even attributes the entire formulation of the Levitical laws to the lives of the founding fathers of the nation, including the righteous Lot (together with Abraham, Jacob, Judah,Moses, and David), who were outstanding figures in Israelite tradition.

According to the scholars mentioned above, the patriarchs of Israel are the key to understanding how the priestly laws concerning incest developed. Kinship marriages amongst the patriarchs includes Abraham’s marriage to his half-sister Sarai;[Gen.20:11,12] the marriage of Abraham’s brother, Nahor, to their niece Milcah;[Gen.11:27–29]Isaac’s marriage to Rebekah, his first cousin once removed;[Gen.27:42–43;29:10] Jacob’s marriages with two sisters who are his first cousins;[Gen.29:10,Ch.29] and, in the instance of Moses’s parents, a marriage between nephew and aunt (father’s sister).[Exod.6:20] Therefore, the patriarchal marriages surely mattered to lawgivers and they suggest a narrative basis for the laws of Leviticus, chapters 18 and 20.[11]

The Levitical laws against incest were created, it has been argued, to separate the lifestyle of the Israelite from the lifestyle of the people of Canaan,[Gen.9:22–28] despite any incestual involvements the patriarchs had had in the past.[12] The Levitical laws were needed for a developing nation who needed to be seen as different from the world, cleansed and blameless: The first step starting with circumcision.[Gen.17:1,10;Ch.17] So nothing could be held against the patriarchs for incestuous behavior because this was part of progressive development, from the ways of the world (coming out of Chaldea) to becoming blameless before their God.[Gen.17:1][12]

Some have argued that Lot’s behavior in offering of his daughters to the men of Sodom in Genesis 19:8 constitutes sexual abuse of his daughters, which created a confusion of kinship roles that was ultimately played out through the incestuous acts in Genesis 19:30–38.[13]

A number of commentators describe the actions of Lot’s daughters as rape. Esther Fuchs suggests that the text presents Lot’s daughters as the “initiators and perpetrators of the incestuous ‘rape’.”[14]

*https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lot_(biblical_person)#Lot_and_his_daughters

Personal Information

Moabites (Nation)
Name Moabites (Nation)
Parents

Half-Siblings

Name Birth Death
Ammonites (Nation)asdasds   
2nd (daughter of Lot)asdasds   
1st (daughter of Lot)asdasds   

Noah Moses

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